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Long-term prognosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: is pharmacological therapy actually necessary?
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Jan; 21(1 Pt 1):169-73.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a wide spectrum of liver injury, ranging from steatosis and steatohepatitis to cirrhosis. Reasons for the different natural course in individuals with NAFLD are still unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the natural course of disease in individuals with NAFLD who did not receive pharmacological therapy.

METHODS

A total of 27 individuals with NAFLD (male/female ratio: 10/17, mean age 49.7 years) were prospectively enrolled. Management after diagnosis consisted of establishment of an appropriate diet and exercise (walking and jogging) program, treatment of associated metabolic conditions such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and discontinuation of potentially hepatotoxic drugs if the patient was taking these. Liver tests were performed at diagnosis and at 3-month intervals during the follow-up period. Mean follow-up period was 43.3 months (range 36-49 months).

RESULTS

From baseline to the end of the follow-up period, although there was no significant difference observed in terms of the mean body mass index, serum aminotransferase levels significantly improved (48.8+/-29.9 U/L to 31.6+/-16.0 U/L for aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and 66.3+/-38.3 U/L to 39.6+/-22.9 U/L for alanine aminotransferase [ALT]; P<0.05). No significant differences in platelet counts, serum albumin level or prothrombin time were observed (P>0.05). No patient developed signs of advanced liver disease during the follow-up period.

CONCLUSION

A treatment strategy comprising diet, exercise and management of associated metabolic conditions is associated with improvement in aminotransferases among patients with NAFLD. Further investigation is needed to examine the long-term efficacy of this approach on liver histology and clinical outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. cinar@medicine.ankara.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16706829

Citation

Cinar, Kubilay, et al. "Long-term Prognosis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is Pharmacological Therapy Actually Necessary?" Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 21, no. 1 Pt 1, 2006, pp. 169-73.
Cinar K, Coban S, Idilman R, et al. Long-term prognosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: is pharmacological therapy actually necessary? J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(1 Pt 1):169-73.
Cinar, K., Coban, S., Idilman, R., Tuzun, A., Sarioglu, M., Bektas, M., Erden, E., Bozkaya, H., & Ozden, A. (2006). Long-term prognosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: is pharmacological therapy actually necessary? Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 21(1 Pt 1), 169-73.
Cinar K, et al. Long-term Prognosis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is Pharmacological Therapy Actually Necessary. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(1 Pt 1):169-73. PubMed PMID: 16706829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term prognosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: is pharmacological therapy actually necessary? AU - Cinar,Kubilay, AU - Coban,Sahin, AU - Idilman,Ramazan, AU - Tuzun,Ali, AU - Sarioglu,Mustafa, AU - Bektas,Mehmet, AU - Erden,Esra, AU - Bozkaya,Hakan, AU - Ozden,Ali, PY - 2006/5/19/pubmed PY - 2007/8/7/medline PY - 2006/5/19/entrez SP - 169 EP - 73 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 21 IS - 1 Pt 1 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a wide spectrum of liver injury, ranging from steatosis and steatohepatitis to cirrhosis. Reasons for the different natural course in individuals with NAFLD are still unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the natural course of disease in individuals with NAFLD who did not receive pharmacological therapy. METHODS: A total of 27 individuals with NAFLD (male/female ratio: 10/17, mean age 49.7 years) were prospectively enrolled. Management after diagnosis consisted of establishment of an appropriate diet and exercise (walking and jogging) program, treatment of associated metabolic conditions such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and discontinuation of potentially hepatotoxic drugs if the patient was taking these. Liver tests were performed at diagnosis and at 3-month intervals during the follow-up period. Mean follow-up period was 43.3 months (range 36-49 months). RESULTS: From baseline to the end of the follow-up period, although there was no significant difference observed in terms of the mean body mass index, serum aminotransferase levels significantly improved (48.8+/-29.9 U/L to 31.6+/-16.0 U/L for aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and 66.3+/-38.3 U/L to 39.6+/-22.9 U/L for alanine aminotransferase [ALT]; P<0.05). No significant differences in platelet counts, serum albumin level or prothrombin time were observed (P>0.05). No patient developed signs of advanced liver disease during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: A treatment strategy comprising diet, exercise and management of associated metabolic conditions is associated with improvement in aminotransferases among patients with NAFLD. Further investigation is needed to examine the long-term efficacy of this approach on liver histology and clinical outcomes. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16706829/Long_term_prognosis_of_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease:_is_pharmacological_therapy_actually_necessary L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2005.04221.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -