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The neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion and its interaction with visuospatial judgments.
Cereb Cortex. 2007 Apr; 17(4):878-84.CC

Abstract

Arrows terminating a line can distort the perceived line length. This so-called Müller-Lyer illusion can be used in healthy human subjects to mimic the performance of neglect patients in visuospatial judgments (e.g., in the landmark task). In this study, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion, the landmark task, and their interaction. This was achieved by parametrically manipulating the magnitude of the Müller-Lyer illusion both in a landmark and in a luminance (control) task. As expected, the landmark task activated right posterior parietal cortex and right temporo-occipital cortex. In contrast, the neural processes associated with the strength of the Müller-Lyer illusion were located bilaterally in the lateral occipital cortex as well as the right superior parietal cortex. The data not only converge with but also extend neuropsychological data that indicate maintained line-length illusion in neglect patients. In addition, our results support the size-constancy scaling hypothesis as a putative mechanism underlying line-length illusions. Furthermore, activation that was driven by both the task and the strength of the Müller-Lyer illusion was observed in right intraparietal sulcus, thus arguing in favor of an interaction of illusory information with the top-down processes underlying visuospatial judgments in right parietal cortex.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brain Imaging Centre West & Institute of Medicine, Research Centre Jülich, and Department of Neurology-Cognitive Neurology, University Hospital, Rheinisch-Westfálische Technische Hochschule, Aachen, Germany. r.weidner@fz-juelich.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16707733

Citation

Weidner, Ralph, and Gereon R. Fink. "The Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Müller-Lyer Illusion and Its Interaction With Visuospatial Judgments." Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991), vol. 17, no. 4, 2007, pp. 878-84.
Weidner R, Fink GR. The neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion and its interaction with visuospatial judgments. Cereb Cortex. 2007;17(4):878-84.
Weidner, R., & Fink, G. R. (2007). The neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion and its interaction with visuospatial judgments. Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991), 17(4), 878-84.
Weidner R, Fink GR. The Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Müller-Lyer Illusion and Its Interaction With Visuospatial Judgments. Cereb Cortex. 2007;17(4):878-84. PubMed PMID: 16707733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion and its interaction with visuospatial judgments. AU - Weidner,Ralph, AU - Fink,Gereon R, Y1 - 2006/05/17/ PY - 2006/5/19/pubmed PY - 2007/4/25/medline PY - 2006/5/19/entrez SP - 878 EP - 84 JF - Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) JO - Cereb. Cortex VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - Arrows terminating a line can distort the perceived line length. This so-called Müller-Lyer illusion can be used in healthy human subjects to mimic the performance of neglect patients in visuospatial judgments (e.g., in the landmark task). In this study, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the Müller-Lyer illusion, the landmark task, and their interaction. This was achieved by parametrically manipulating the magnitude of the Müller-Lyer illusion both in a landmark and in a luminance (control) task. As expected, the landmark task activated right posterior parietal cortex and right temporo-occipital cortex. In contrast, the neural processes associated with the strength of the Müller-Lyer illusion were located bilaterally in the lateral occipital cortex as well as the right superior parietal cortex. The data not only converge with but also extend neuropsychological data that indicate maintained line-length illusion in neglect patients. In addition, our results support the size-constancy scaling hypothesis as a putative mechanism underlying line-length illusions. Furthermore, activation that was driven by both the task and the strength of the Müller-Lyer illusion was observed in right intraparietal sulcus, thus arguing in favor of an interaction of illusory information with the top-down processes underlying visuospatial judgments in right parietal cortex. SN - 1047-3211 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16707733/The_neural_mechanisms_underlying_the_Müller_Lyer_illusion_and_its_interaction_with_visuospatial_judgments_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cercor/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cercor/bhk042 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -