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Physical dating violence among high school students--United States, 2003.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006 May 19; 55(19):532-5.MM

Abstract

Dating violence is defined as physical, sexual, or psychological violence within a dating relationship. In a study of dating violence victimization among students in grades 7-12 during 1994-1995, the 18-month prevalence of victimization from physical and psychological dating violence was estimated at 12% and 20%, respectively. In addition to the risk for injury and death, victims of dating violence are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, unhealthy dieting behaviors, substance use, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Dating violence victimization can be a precursor for intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in adulthood, most notably among women. Among adult women in the United States, an estimated 5.3 million IPV incidents occur each year, resulting in approximately 2 million injuries and 1,300 deaths. By using data from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), CDC analyzed the prevalence of physical dating violence (PDV) victimization among high school students and its association with five risk behaviors. The results indicated that 8.9% of students (8.9% of males and 8.8% of females) reported PDV victimization during the 12 months preceding the survey and that students reporting PDV victimization were more likely to engage in four of the five risk behaviors (i.e., sexual intercourse, attempted suicide, episodic heavy drinking, and physical fighting). Primary prevention programs are needed to educate high school students about healthy dating relationship behaviors, and secondary prevention programs should address risk behaviors associated with dating violence victimization.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16708057

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Physical Dating Violence Among High School students--United States, 2003." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 55, no. 19, 2006, pp. 532-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Physical dating violence among high school students--United States, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006;55(19):532-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2006). Physical dating violence among high school students--United States, 2003. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 55(19), 532-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Physical Dating Violence Among High School students--United States, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006 May 19;55(19):532-5. PubMed PMID: 16708057.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical dating violence among high school students--United States, 2003. A1 - ,, PY - 2006/5/19/pubmed PY - 2006/5/23/medline PY - 2006/5/19/entrez SP - 532 EP - 5 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 55 IS - 19 N2 - Dating violence is defined as physical, sexual, or psychological violence within a dating relationship. In a study of dating violence victimization among students in grades 7-12 during 1994-1995, the 18-month prevalence of victimization from physical and psychological dating violence was estimated at 12% and 20%, respectively. In addition to the risk for injury and death, victims of dating violence are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, unhealthy dieting behaviors, substance use, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Dating violence victimization can be a precursor for intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in adulthood, most notably among women. Among adult women in the United States, an estimated 5.3 million IPV incidents occur each year, resulting in approximately 2 million injuries and 1,300 deaths. By using data from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), CDC analyzed the prevalence of physical dating violence (PDV) victimization among high school students and its association with five risk behaviors. The results indicated that 8.9% of students (8.9% of males and 8.8% of females) reported PDV victimization during the 12 months preceding the survey and that students reporting PDV victimization were more likely to engage in four of the five risk behaviors (i.e., sexual intercourse, attempted suicide, episodic heavy drinking, and physical fighting). Primary prevention programs are needed to educate high school students about healthy dating relationship behaviors, and secondary prevention programs should address risk behaviors associated with dating violence victimization. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16708057/Physical_dating_violence_among_high_school_students__United_States_2003_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -