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Race disparities in childhood asthma: does where you live matter?
J Natl Med Assoc 2006; 98(2):239-47JN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study investigates whether racial/ethnic disparities in childhood asthma prevalence can be explained by differences in family and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP).

METHODS

Data were from the 2001 Rhode Island Health Interview Survey (RI HIS), a statewide representative sample of 2,600 Rhode Island households, and the 2000 U.S. Census. A series of weighted multivariate models were fitted using generalized estimating equations (GEE) for the logistic case to analyze the independent and joint effects of race/ethnicity and SEP on doctor-diagnosed asthma among 1,769 white, black and Hispanic children <18 years old.

RESULTS

Compared with white children, black children were at increased odds for asthma and this effect persisted when measures of family and neighborhood SEP were included in multivariate models (AOR: 2.49; 95% Cl: 1.30-4.77). Black children living in poverty neighborhoods had substantially higher odds of asthma than Hispanic and white children in poverty areas and children in moderate- and high-income neighborhoods (AOR: 3.20: 95% Cl: 1.62-6.29).

CONCLUSION

The high prevalence of asthma among black children in poor neighborhoods is consistent with previous research on higher-than-average prevalence of childhood asthma in poor urban minority communities. Changing neighborhood social structures that contribute to racial disparities in asthma prevalence remains a challenge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. deborah_pearlman@brown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16708510

Citation

Pearlman, Deborah N., et al. "Race Disparities in Childhood Asthma: Does Where You Live Matter?" Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 98, no. 2, 2006, pp. 239-47.
Pearlman DN, Zierler S, Meersman S, et al. Race disparities in childhood asthma: does where you live matter? J Natl Med Assoc. 2006;98(2):239-47.
Pearlman, D. N., Zierler, S., Meersman, S., Kim, H. K., Viner-Brown, S. I., & Caron, C. (2006). Race disparities in childhood asthma: does where you live matter? Journal of the National Medical Association, 98(2), pp. 239-47.
Pearlman DN, et al. Race Disparities in Childhood Asthma: Does Where You Live Matter. J Natl Med Assoc. 2006;98(2):239-47. PubMed PMID: 16708510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race disparities in childhood asthma: does where you live matter? AU - Pearlman,Deborah N, AU - Zierler,Sally, AU - Meersman,Stephen, AU - Kim,Hyun K, AU - Viner-Brown,Samara I, AU - Caron,Colleen, PY - 2006/5/20/pubmed PY - 2006/7/1/medline PY - 2006/5/20/entrez SP - 239 EP - 47 JF - Journal of the National Medical Association JO - J Natl Med Assoc VL - 98 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether racial/ethnic disparities in childhood asthma prevalence can be explained by differences in family and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP). METHODS: Data were from the 2001 Rhode Island Health Interview Survey (RI HIS), a statewide representative sample of 2,600 Rhode Island households, and the 2000 U.S. Census. A series of weighted multivariate models were fitted using generalized estimating equations (GEE) for the logistic case to analyze the independent and joint effects of race/ethnicity and SEP on doctor-diagnosed asthma among 1,769 white, black and Hispanic children <18 years old. RESULTS: Compared with white children, black children were at increased odds for asthma and this effect persisted when measures of family and neighborhood SEP were included in multivariate models (AOR: 2.49; 95% Cl: 1.30-4.77). Black children living in poverty neighborhoods had substantially higher odds of asthma than Hispanic and white children in poverty areas and children in moderate- and high-income neighborhoods (AOR: 3.20: 95% Cl: 1.62-6.29). CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of asthma among black children in poor neighborhoods is consistent with previous research on higher-than-average prevalence of childhood asthma in poor urban minority communities. Changing neighborhood social structures that contribute to racial disparities in asthma prevalence remains a challenge. SN - 0027-9684 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16708510/Race_disparities_in_childhood_asthma:_does_where_you_live_matter L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/16708510/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -