Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate for postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Curr Med Res Opin 2006; 22(5):919-28CM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

This paper discusses the efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

METHODS

The literature was searched with the PubMed from 1996 to the present, with respect to strictly conducted systematic reviews with homogeneity, meta-analyses with homogeneity, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with narrow Confidence Interval.

RESULTS

According to the results of large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate, and ibandronate), raloxifene, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and strontium ranelate effectively prevent vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Because raloxifene has been shown to be effective in preventing the initial vertebral fracture in postmenopausal osteoporotic women without prevalent vertebral fractures, it is considered in the treatment of postmenopausal women with mild osteoporosis or osteopenia with some risk factors for fractures. RCTs have also demonstrated that alendronate, risedronate, PTH, and strontium are useful to prevent non-vertebral fractures and that alendronate and risedronate prevent hip fractures, thus alendronate or risedronate are primarily considered as the first-line drugs in the treatment of elderly women with osteoporosis having some risk factors for falls. While it has been suggested that PTH may be considered in patients with severe osteoporosis, the use of PTH in the treatment for osteoporosis is limited to 2 years or less, and it may be appropriate to use other anti-resorptive drugs after the completion of PTH treatment to maintain the skeletal effects gained during the treatment. RCTs have demonstrated that the incidence of gastrointestinal tract adverse events in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates and placebo are similar, and also the long-term efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate.

CONCLUSION

The evidence derived from the literature, based on strict evidence-based medicine guidelines, suggests that there is long-term efficacy and safety with alendronate and risedronate in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16709313

Citation

Iwamoto, Jun, et al. "Efficacy and Safety of Alendronate and Risedronate for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis." Current Medical Research and Opinion, vol. 22, no. 5, 2006, pp. 919-28.
Iwamoto J, Takeda T, Sato Y. Efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Curr Med Res Opin. 2006;22(5):919-28.
Iwamoto, J., Takeda, T., & Sato, Y. (2006). Efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 22(5), pp. 919-28.
Iwamoto J, Takeda T, Sato Y. Efficacy and Safety of Alendronate and Risedronate for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis. Curr Med Res Opin. 2006;22(5):919-28. PubMed PMID: 16709313.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. AU - Iwamoto,Jun, AU - Takeda,Tsuyoshi, AU - Sato,Yoshihiro, PY - 2006/5/20/pubmed PY - 2006/9/23/medline PY - 2006/5/20/entrez SP - 919 EP - 28 JF - Current medical research and opinion JO - Curr Med Res Opin VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: This paper discusses the efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. METHODS: The literature was searched with the PubMed from 1996 to the present, with respect to strictly conducted systematic reviews with homogeneity, meta-analyses with homogeneity, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with narrow Confidence Interval. RESULTS: According to the results of large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate, and ibandronate), raloxifene, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and strontium ranelate effectively prevent vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Because raloxifene has been shown to be effective in preventing the initial vertebral fracture in postmenopausal osteoporotic women without prevalent vertebral fractures, it is considered in the treatment of postmenopausal women with mild osteoporosis or osteopenia with some risk factors for fractures. RCTs have also demonstrated that alendronate, risedronate, PTH, and strontium are useful to prevent non-vertebral fractures and that alendronate and risedronate prevent hip fractures, thus alendronate or risedronate are primarily considered as the first-line drugs in the treatment of elderly women with osteoporosis having some risk factors for falls. While it has been suggested that PTH may be considered in patients with severe osteoporosis, the use of PTH in the treatment for osteoporosis is limited to 2 years or less, and it may be appropriate to use other anti-resorptive drugs after the completion of PTH treatment to maintain the skeletal effects gained during the treatment. RCTs have demonstrated that the incidence of gastrointestinal tract adverse events in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates and placebo are similar, and also the long-term efficacy and safety of alendronate and risedronate. CONCLUSION: The evidence derived from the literature, based on strict evidence-based medicine guidelines, suggests that there is long-term efficacy and safety with alendronate and risedronate in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. SN - 0300-7995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16709313/Efficacy_and_safety_of_alendronate_and_risedronate_for_postmenopausal_osteoporosis_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1185/030079906X100276 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -