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Work-family balance and academic advancement in medical schools.
Acad Psychiatry. 2006 May-Jun; 30(3):227-34.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement.

METHOD

Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM) faculty members conducted in 2003; exogenous data regarding the entire UI-COM faculty; and tenure rollback ("stop-the-clock") usage by all tenure track-eligible UI-COM faculty from 1994 to 2003.

RESULTS

The data reveal a gender split in career-family balance priorities that affect academic advancement among part-time faculty. Women select part-time status for child care; men choose part-time to moonlight. Similarly, among all faculty members seeking tenure rollbacks, women request rollback for child care; men request rollback for other reasons. Among all faculty members, full-time men were more likely to be on the tenure track than any other group. Needs identified by the part-time faculty survey include improved mentoring in track selection, heightened awareness of options, such as tenure rollback, and provision of equitable benefits and opportunities.

CONCLUSIONS

Policy changes, such as a prorated tenure track, are needed to support a family-friendly culture with flexibility throughout the career lifespan for both men and women medical faculty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 W. Roosevelt Rd., Mailroom 155, Chicago, IL 60608, USA. foxg@uic.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16728769

Citation

Fox, Geri, et al. "Work-family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools." Academic Psychiatry : the Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry, vol. 30, no. 3, 2006, pp. 227-34.
Fox G, Schwartz A, Hart KM. Work-family balance and academic advancement in medical schools. Acad Psychiatry. 2006;30(3):227-34.
Fox, G., Schwartz, A., & Hart, K. M. (2006). Work-family balance and academic advancement in medical schools. Academic Psychiatry : the Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry, 30(3), 227-34.
Fox G, Schwartz A, Hart KM. Work-family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools. Acad Psychiatry. 2006 May-Jun;30(3):227-34. PubMed PMID: 16728769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work-family balance and academic advancement in medical schools. AU - Fox,Geri, AU - Schwartz,Alan, AU - Hart,Katherine M, PY - 2006/5/27/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/5/27/entrez SP - 227 EP - 34 JF - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry JO - Acad Psychiatry VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. METHOD: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM) faculty members conducted in 2003; exogenous data regarding the entire UI-COM faculty; and tenure rollback ("stop-the-clock") usage by all tenure track-eligible UI-COM faculty from 1994 to 2003. RESULTS: The data reveal a gender split in career-family balance priorities that affect academic advancement among part-time faculty. Women select part-time status for child care; men choose part-time to moonlight. Similarly, among all faculty members seeking tenure rollbacks, women request rollback for child care; men request rollback for other reasons. Among all faculty members, full-time men were more likely to be on the tenure track than any other group. Needs identified by the part-time faculty survey include improved mentoring in track selection, heightened awareness of options, such as tenure rollback, and provision of equitable benefits and opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: Policy changes, such as a prorated tenure track, are needed to support a family-friendly culture with flexibility throughout the career lifespan for both men and women medical faculty. SN - 1042-9670 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16728769/Work_family_balance_and_academic_advancement_in_medical_schools_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=16728769.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -