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Fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid status and determinants in long-term hemodialysis.
Am J Kidney Dis. 2006 Jun; 47(6):1064-71.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Blood levels of the anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective omega-3 eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) fatty acids are determined primarily by dietary consumption. There is reason to believe that hemodialysis patients are at risk for inadequate omega-3 intake and, consequently, low blood levels.

METHODS

This question was tested in 75 long-term hemodialysis patients and 25 matched controls by measuring fasting, predialysis plasma and red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels using gas chromatography and performing a fish-consumption survey.

RESULTS

Sixty-seven percent of patients did not meet American Heart Association fish-consumption guidelines for healthy persons. Compared with controls, patients had lower plasma omega-3 levels (mean % wt: DHA, 1.33 +/- 0.38 [SD] versus 1.51 +/- 0.36; P = 0.0370; omega-3 index [ie, EPA plus DHA], 1.67 +/- 0.49 versus 1.92 +/- 0.40; P = 0.0249). RBC levels, which estimate more long-term consumption, showed mixed results (EPA, 0.29 +/- 0.08 versus 0.33 +/- 0.11; P = 0.0816; DHA, 4.65 +/- 0.92 versus 3.16 +/- 1.15; P < 0.0001; omega-3 index, 4.95 +/- 0.95 versus 3.49 +/- 1.22; P < 0.0001). RBC omega-3 levels in patients roughly reflected fish consumption. Independent predictors of plasma and RBC omega-3 levels at the 0.05 level of significance included age, race, sex, alcohol use, and fish servings.

CONCLUSION

Hemodialysis patients consumed fish in quantities far below current American Heart Association recommendations and manifested suboptimal omega-3 levels given their high heart disease risk. These results identify a potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA. allfried@ipui.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16731302

Citation

Friedman, Allon N., et al. "Fish Consumption and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status and Determinants in Long-term Hemodialysis." American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 47, no. 6, 2006, pp. 1064-71.
Friedman AN, Moe SM, Perkins SM, et al. Fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid status and determinants in long-term hemodialysis. Am J Kidney Dis. 2006;47(6):1064-71.
Friedman, A. N., Moe, S. M., Perkins, S. M., Li, Y., & Watkins, B. A. (2006). Fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid status and determinants in long-term hemodialysis. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 47(6), 1064-71.
Friedman AN, et al. Fish Consumption and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status and Determinants in Long-term Hemodialysis. Am J Kidney Dis. 2006;47(6):1064-71. PubMed PMID: 16731302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid status and determinants in long-term hemodialysis. AU - Friedman,Allon N, AU - Moe,Sharon M, AU - Perkins,Susan M, AU - Li,Yong, AU - Watkins,Bruce A, PY - 2006/01/17/received PY - 2006/03/08/accepted PY - 2006/5/30/pubmed PY - 2006/6/10/medline PY - 2006/5/30/entrez SP - 1064 EP - 71 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am. J. Kidney Dis. VL - 47 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Blood levels of the anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective omega-3 eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) fatty acids are determined primarily by dietary consumption. There is reason to believe that hemodialysis patients are at risk for inadequate omega-3 intake and, consequently, low blood levels. METHODS: This question was tested in 75 long-term hemodialysis patients and 25 matched controls by measuring fasting, predialysis plasma and red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels using gas chromatography and performing a fish-consumption survey. RESULTS: Sixty-seven percent of patients did not meet American Heart Association fish-consumption guidelines for healthy persons. Compared with controls, patients had lower plasma omega-3 levels (mean % wt: DHA, 1.33 +/- 0.38 [SD] versus 1.51 +/- 0.36; P = 0.0370; omega-3 index [ie, EPA plus DHA], 1.67 +/- 0.49 versus 1.92 +/- 0.40; P = 0.0249). RBC levels, which estimate more long-term consumption, showed mixed results (EPA, 0.29 +/- 0.08 versus 0.33 +/- 0.11; P = 0.0816; DHA, 4.65 +/- 0.92 versus 3.16 +/- 1.15; P < 0.0001; omega-3 index, 4.95 +/- 0.95 versus 3.49 +/- 1.22; P < 0.0001). RBC omega-3 levels in patients roughly reflected fish consumption. Independent predictors of plasma and RBC omega-3 levels at the 0.05 level of significance included age, race, sex, alcohol use, and fish servings. CONCLUSION: Hemodialysis patients consumed fish in quantities far below current American Heart Association recommendations and manifested suboptimal omega-3 levels given their high heart disease risk. These results identify a potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16731302/Fish_consumption_and_omega_3_fatty_acid_status_and_determinants_in_long_term_hemodialysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-6386(06)00528-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -