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Burdach's column.
Eur Neurol. 2006; 55(3):179-80.EN

Abstract

After the Greek physicians Herophilus and Galen, the major anatomical advances in the anatomy of the spinal cord were made possible by the microtome devised by Benedikt Stilling in January 1842. This enabled him to cut the frozen, thin sections and examine them, unstained,with the microscope. The technique founded future investigation of the cord's anatomy. Brown-Séquard, Türck, Clarke, Lissauer, Goll, and Flechsig all contributed. An important result of these progressing anatomical experiments was the identification of the posterior columns. In 1826, the German physiologist Karl Friedrich Burdach (1776-1847) described, from macroscopic study, the fasciculus cuneatus, known as the tract of Burdach: the lateral portion of the posterior columns of the cord that terminate in the nucleus cuneatus of the medulla.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16733361

Citation

Pearce, J M S.. "Burdach's Column." European Neurology, vol. 55, no. 3, 2006, pp. 179-80.
Pearce JM. Burdach's column. Eur Neurol. 2006;55(3):179-80.
Pearce, J. M. (2006). Burdach's column. European Neurology, 55(3), 179-80.
Pearce JM. Burdach's Column. Eur Neurol. 2006;55(3):179-80. PubMed PMID: 16733361.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Burdach's column. A1 - Pearce,J M S, PY - 2006/01/29/received PY - 2006/02/01/accepted PY - 2006/5/31/pubmed PY - 2006/8/26/medline PY - 2006/5/31/entrez SP - 179 EP - 80 JF - European neurology JO - Eur. Neurol. VL - 55 IS - 3 N2 - After the Greek physicians Herophilus and Galen, the major anatomical advances in the anatomy of the spinal cord were made possible by the microtome devised by Benedikt Stilling in January 1842. This enabled him to cut the frozen, thin sections and examine them, unstained,with the microscope. The technique founded future investigation of the cord's anatomy. Brown-Séquard, Türck, Clarke, Lissauer, Goll, and Flechsig all contributed. An important result of these progressing anatomical experiments was the identification of the posterior columns. In 1826, the German physiologist Karl Friedrich Burdach (1776-1847) described, from macroscopic study, the fasciculus cuneatus, known as the tract of Burdach: the lateral portion of the posterior columns of the cord that terminate in the nucleus cuneatus of the medulla. SN - 0014-3022 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16733361/Burdach's_column_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000093580 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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