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[Highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry (fowl plague); implications for human health].

Abstract

Since 1997, high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection in poultry "avian plague" has emerged as a potential threat to human health, with some fatal cases of bird-to-human transmission. These sporadic infections are caused by H7N7 and H5N1 viruses in Europe and Asia, respectively. The persistence of H5N1 viruses in poultry in several Asian countries, and their appearance in Europe, has raised concerns that the virus might mutate or recombine to create a human pandemic influenza A virus. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses, and rarely develop the disease. Since 2002, some H5N1 HPAI viruses have become lethal for waterfowl, cats and humans, indicating an expanding host range. Transmission of H5N1 HPAI viruses from domestic poultry back to resistant domestic and wild ducks and to terrestrial birds (sparrows, pigeons, falcons, etc.) has increased the risk of geographic spread in Asia. These viruses spread through fecal contamination of the environment (particularly groundwater). Low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses cause localized respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infection and, unlike HPAI viruses, are not detected in blood, muscle or eggs. Detection of HPAI viruses in meat, blood and internal organs of chickens and ducks raises public health concerns and underlines the need to thoroughly cook poultry and eggs consumed in Asia. The last case of HPA1 virus infection in France was notified in 1955.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Membre de l'Académie nationale de médecine - Ecole nationale vétérinaire d'Alfort du Général de Gaulle, 94704 Maisons-Alfort Cédex, France.

Source

MeSH

Animals
Birds
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype
Influenza A Virus, H7N7 Subtype
Influenza in Birds
Influenza, Human
Public Health

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

16737105

Citation

Brugere-Picoux, Jeanne. "[Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Poultry (fowl Plague); Implications for Human Health]." Bulletin De l'Academie Nationale De Medecine, vol. 189, no. 8, 2005, pp. 1817-26.
Brugere-Picoux J. [Highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry (fowl plague); implications for human health]. Bull Acad Natl Med. 2005;189(8):1817-26.
Brugere-Picoux, J. (2005). [Highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry (fowl plague); implications for human health]. Bulletin De l'Academie Nationale De Medecine, 189(8), pp. 1817-26.
Brugere-Picoux J. [Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Poultry (fowl Plague); Implications for Human Health]. Bull Acad Natl Med. 2005;189(8):1817-26. PubMed PMID: 16737105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry (fowl plague); implications for human health]. A1 - Brugere-Picoux,Jeanne, PY - 2006/6/2/pubmed PY - 2006/7/21/medline PY - 2006/6/2/entrez SP - 1817 EP - 26 JF - Bulletin de l'Academie nationale de medecine JO - Bull. Acad. Natl. Med. VL - 189 IS - 8 N2 - Since 1997, high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection in poultry "avian plague" has emerged as a potential threat to human health, with some fatal cases of bird-to-human transmission. These sporadic infections are caused by H7N7 and H5N1 viruses in Europe and Asia, respectively. The persistence of H5N1 viruses in poultry in several Asian countries, and their appearance in Europe, has raised concerns that the virus might mutate or recombine to create a human pandemic influenza A virus. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses, and rarely develop the disease. Since 2002, some H5N1 HPAI viruses have become lethal for waterfowl, cats and humans, indicating an expanding host range. Transmission of H5N1 HPAI viruses from domestic poultry back to resistant domestic and wild ducks and to terrestrial birds (sparrows, pigeons, falcons, etc.) has increased the risk of geographic spread in Asia. These viruses spread through fecal contamination of the environment (particularly groundwater). Low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses cause localized respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infection and, unlike HPAI viruses, are not detected in blood, muscle or eggs. Detection of HPAI viruses in meat, blood and internal organs of chickens and ducks raises public health concerns and underlines the need to thoroughly cook poultry and eggs consumed in Asia. The last case of HPA1 virus infection in France was notified in 1955. SN - 0001-4079 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16737105/[Highly_pathogenic_avian_influenza_in_poultry__fowl_plague_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/flu.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -