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Exercise tolerance in a hot and humid climate in heat-acclimatized girls and women.
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Dec; 27(12):943-50.IJ

Abstract

This study compared physiological responses associated with exercise tolerance in girls (G) and women (W) of similar fitness and heat acclimatization level during exercise in a hot and humid outdoor environment (33.4 degrees C and 55.1 % RH; WBGT = 29.9 +/- 0.2 degrees C). Nine pre-menarcheal G (age = 11.3 yr) and nine W (age = 26.8 yr), matched for aerobic capacity and heat acclimatization level, performed a cycling session at 60 % VO2max until fatigue. A sports drink was provided periodically to prevent dehydration. Tolerance time was not different between the groups (G = 56.9 +/- 6.3, W = 76.5 +/- 9.9 min, p > 0.05). During exercise, sweat rate (G = 9.1 +/- 1.1, W = 12.0 +/- 1.1 ml.m(-2).min(-1)), the increase in rectal temperature [T(re)] (G = 0.9 +/- 0.1, W = 1.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C), and heat storage (G = 10.6 +/- 5.3, W = 20.5 +/- 4.5 W.m(-2)) did not differ between the groups. At fatigue, T(re) (G = 38.2 +/- 0.1, W = 38.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C), heart rate (G = 167.3 +/- 7.3, W = 171 +/- 3.3 beats.min(-1)), stroke index (G = 48.3 +/- 1.5, W = 52.4 +/- 1.8 ml.m(-2)), and forearm skin blood flow (G = 9.5 +/- 1.3, W = 11.7 +/- 1.5 ml.100 ml(- 1).min(-1)) did not differ between the groups. Similar to women, the main reasons reported by girls to stop exercising in the heat were localized leg fatigue and gluteus muscle discomfort. We conclude that heat-acclimatized girls exhibit an adequate cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adjustment while exercising in a hot and humid outdoor environment when hypohydration is prevented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Sports Health and Exercise Sciences, Department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico. aniriver@coqui.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16739090

Citation

Rivera-Brown, A M., et al. "Exercise Tolerance in a Hot and Humid Climate in Heat-acclimatized Girls and Women." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 27, no. 12, 2006, pp. 943-50.
Rivera-Brown AM, Rowland TW, Ramírez-Marrero FA, et al. Exercise tolerance in a hot and humid climate in heat-acclimatized girls and women. Int J Sports Med. 2006;27(12):943-50.
Rivera-Brown, A. M., Rowland, T. W., Ramírez-Marrero, F. A., Santacana, G., & Vann, A. (2006). Exercise tolerance in a hot and humid climate in heat-acclimatized girls and women. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 27(12), 943-50.
Rivera-Brown AM, et al. Exercise Tolerance in a Hot and Humid Climate in Heat-acclimatized Girls and Women. Int J Sports Med. 2006;27(12):943-50. PubMed PMID: 16739090.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise tolerance in a hot and humid climate in heat-acclimatized girls and women. AU - Rivera-Brown,A M, AU - Rowland,T W, AU - Ramírez-Marrero,F A, AU - Santacana,G, AU - Vann,A, Y1 - 2006/05/30/ PY - 2006/6/2/pubmed PY - 2007/3/3/medline PY - 2006/6/2/entrez SP - 943 EP - 50 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 27 IS - 12 N2 - This study compared physiological responses associated with exercise tolerance in girls (G) and women (W) of similar fitness and heat acclimatization level during exercise in a hot and humid outdoor environment (33.4 degrees C and 55.1 % RH; WBGT = 29.9 +/- 0.2 degrees C). Nine pre-menarcheal G (age = 11.3 yr) and nine W (age = 26.8 yr), matched for aerobic capacity and heat acclimatization level, performed a cycling session at 60 % VO2max until fatigue. A sports drink was provided periodically to prevent dehydration. Tolerance time was not different between the groups (G = 56.9 +/- 6.3, W = 76.5 +/- 9.9 min, p > 0.05). During exercise, sweat rate (G = 9.1 +/- 1.1, W = 12.0 +/- 1.1 ml.m(-2).min(-1)), the increase in rectal temperature [T(re)] (G = 0.9 +/- 0.1, W = 1.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C), and heat storage (G = 10.6 +/- 5.3, W = 20.5 +/- 4.5 W.m(-2)) did not differ between the groups. At fatigue, T(re) (G = 38.2 +/- 0.1, W = 38.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C), heart rate (G = 167.3 +/- 7.3, W = 171 +/- 3.3 beats.min(-1)), stroke index (G = 48.3 +/- 1.5, W = 52.4 +/- 1.8 ml.m(-2)), and forearm skin blood flow (G = 9.5 +/- 1.3, W = 11.7 +/- 1.5 ml.100 ml(- 1).min(-1)) did not differ between the groups. Similar to women, the main reasons reported by girls to stop exercising in the heat were localized leg fatigue and gluteus muscle discomfort. We conclude that heat-acclimatized girls exhibit an adequate cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adjustment while exercising in a hot and humid outdoor environment when hypohydration is prevented. SN - 0172-4622 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16739090/Exercise_tolerance_in_a_hot_and_humid_climate_in_heat_acclimatized_girls_and_women_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2006-923863 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -