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Social capital, family violence, and neglect.
Pediatrics. 2006 Jun; 117(6):e1124-31.Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social capital includes collective efficacy, psychological sense of community, neighborhood cohesion, and parental investment in the child. It has been shown to be associated with a variety of health and welfare outcomes and may be useful in understanding and preventing parenting behaviors on the continuum of child abuse and neglect.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this research was to evaluate low social capital as a risk factor for harsh physical punishment, neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence.

METHODS

This study is an analysis of cross-sectional telephone survey data of mothers in North and South Carolina (n = 1435). We constructed a 4-point social capital index reflecting survey responses to items ascertaining neighborhood characteristics, willingness to take personal action, the presence of 2 adults in the household, and regular religious service participation. We assessed the relationship of social capital to inventories of self-reported parenting behaviors and in-home violence.

RESULTS

In adjusted analysis, we found that each 1 point increase in a 4-point social capital index was associated with a 30% reduction in the odds of neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence. There was no relationship between social capital and harsh physical punishment.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that increasing social capital decreases the odds of neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence but not harsh physical punishment. This supports further investigation into developing social capital as a resource for families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7595, USA. ajzolo@med.unc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16740814

Citation

Zolotor, Adam J., and Desmond K. Runyan. "Social Capital, Family Violence, and Neglect." Pediatrics, vol. 117, no. 6, 2006, pp. e1124-31.
Zolotor AJ, Runyan DK. Social capital, family violence, and neglect. Pediatrics. 2006;117(6):e1124-31.
Zolotor, A. J., & Runyan, D. K. (2006). Social capital, family violence, and neglect. Pediatrics, 117(6), e1124-31.
Zolotor AJ, Runyan DK. Social Capital, Family Violence, and Neglect. Pediatrics. 2006;117(6):e1124-31. PubMed PMID: 16740814.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social capital, family violence, and neglect. AU - Zolotor,Adam J, AU - Runyan,Desmond K, PY - 2006/6/3/pubmed PY - 2006/6/27/medline PY - 2006/6/3/entrez SP - e1124 EP - 31 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 117 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social capital includes collective efficacy, psychological sense of community, neighborhood cohesion, and parental investment in the child. It has been shown to be associated with a variety of health and welfare outcomes and may be useful in understanding and preventing parenting behaviors on the continuum of child abuse and neglect. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research was to evaluate low social capital as a risk factor for harsh physical punishment, neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence. METHODS: This study is an analysis of cross-sectional telephone survey data of mothers in North and South Carolina (n = 1435). We constructed a 4-point social capital index reflecting survey responses to items ascertaining neighborhood characteristics, willingness to take personal action, the presence of 2 adults in the household, and regular religious service participation. We assessed the relationship of social capital to inventories of self-reported parenting behaviors and in-home violence. RESULTS: In adjusted analysis, we found that each 1 point increase in a 4-point social capital index was associated with a 30% reduction in the odds of neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence. There was no relationship between social capital and harsh physical punishment. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that increasing social capital decreases the odds of neglectful parenting, psychologically harsh parenting, and domestic violence but not harsh physical punishment. This supports further investigation into developing social capital as a resource for families. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16740814/Social_capital_family_violence_and_neglect_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16740814 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -