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Omega-3 fatty acids and mood disorders.
Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun; 163(6):969-78.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This article is an overview of epidemiological and treatment studies suggesting that deficits in dietary-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may make an etiological contribution to mood disorders and that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may provide a therapeutic strategy.

METHOD

Relevant published studies are detailed and considered.

RESULTS

Several epidemiological studies suggest covariation between seafood consumption and rates of mood disorders. Biological marker studies indicate deficits in omega-3 fatty acids in people with depressive disorders, while several treatment studies indicate therapeutic benefits from omega-3 supplementation. A similar contribution of omega-3 fatty acids to coronary artery disease may explain the well-described links between coronary artery disease and depression.

CONCLUSIONS

Deficits in omega-3 fatty acids have been identified as a contributing factor to mood disorders and offer a potential rational treatment approach. This review identifies a number of hypotheses and studies for consideration. In particular, the authors argue for studies clarifying the efficacy of omega-3 supplementation for unipolar and bipolar depressive disorders, both as individual and augmentation treatment strategies, and for studies pursuing which omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), is likely to provide the greatest benefit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, and Black Dog Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia. g.parker@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16741195

Citation

Parker, Gordon, et al. "Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Mood Disorders." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 163, no. 6, 2006, pp. 969-78.
Parker G, Gibson NA, Brotchie H, et al. Omega-3 fatty acids and mood disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163(6):969-78.
Parker, G., Gibson, N. A., Brotchie, H., Heruc, G., Rees, A. M., & Hadzi-Pavlovic, D. (2006). Omega-3 fatty acids and mood disorders. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 163(6), 969-78.
Parker G, et al. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Mood Disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163(6):969-78. PubMed PMID: 16741195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Omega-3 fatty acids and mood disorders. AU - Parker,Gordon, AU - Gibson,Neville A, AU - Brotchie,Heather, AU - Heruc,Gabriella, AU - Rees,Anne-Marie, AU - Hadzi-Pavlovic,Dusan, PY - 2006/6/3/pubmed PY - 2006/7/13/medline PY - 2006/6/3/entrez SP - 969 EP - 78 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 163 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This article is an overview of epidemiological and treatment studies suggesting that deficits in dietary-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may make an etiological contribution to mood disorders and that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may provide a therapeutic strategy. METHOD: Relevant published studies are detailed and considered. RESULTS: Several epidemiological studies suggest covariation between seafood consumption and rates of mood disorders. Biological marker studies indicate deficits in omega-3 fatty acids in people with depressive disorders, while several treatment studies indicate therapeutic benefits from omega-3 supplementation. A similar contribution of omega-3 fatty acids to coronary artery disease may explain the well-described links between coronary artery disease and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Deficits in omega-3 fatty acids have been identified as a contributing factor to mood disorders and offer a potential rational treatment approach. This review identifies a number of hypotheses and studies for consideration. In particular, the authors argue for studies clarifying the efficacy of omega-3 supplementation for unipolar and bipolar depressive disorders, both as individual and augmentation treatment strategies, and for studies pursuing which omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), is likely to provide the greatest benefit. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16741195/Omega_3_fatty_acids_and_mood_disorders_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/ajp.2006.163.6.969?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -