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Ethnic differences in Type 2 diabetes care and outcomes in Auckland: a multiethnic community in New Zealand.
N Z Med J. 2006 Jun 02; 119(1235):U1997.NZ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

In New Zealand, Maori and Pacific (mostly of Samoan, Tongan, Niuean, or Cook Islands origin) people with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to suffer poor outcomes than other New Zealanders. Responsibility for addressing this outcome differential is falling on primary care and general practice in particular. This paper compares the general practice care provided to people with Type 2 diabetes in South and West Auckland, according to ethnicity.

METHOD

An external audit of general practice diabetes care is carried out in South and West Auckland by the Diabetes Care Support Service. The results of 5917 routine patient audits carried out in 2003 are included in this study. Number of visits, recording of important information, risk factors, and treatments are compared between different ethnic groups.

RESULTS

Maori and Pacific people with diabetes who attend a regular GP had a higher average number of consultations than Europeans (5.7, 5.4, and 4.8 visits per year respectively). They were as likely as Europeans to have undergone important regular examinations and investigations. Maori were more likely than Europeans to be on some treatments. However, Maori and Pacific people were more likely to have a range of adverse risk factors for diabetes complications than Europeans. These include being a smoker (35, 18, and 13% respectively), having an HbA1c greater than 8% (50, 56, 23%), and having microalbuminuria (55, 50, 27%).

DISCUSSION

Although there were no large differences in the process measures of general practice diabetes care provided to different ethnic groups in South and West Auckland, Maori and Pacific people were not achieving the same outcomes of care in terms of risk factors for diabetes complications. Many of these risk factors are influenced by other factors in the wider community; however the New Zealand health system needs to consider how it can better address these differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Counties-Manukau District Health Board, Auckland. trobinson@cmdhb.org.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16751821

Citation

Robinson, Tom, et al. "Ethnic Differences in Type 2 Diabetes Care and Outcomes in Auckland: a Multiethnic Community in New Zealand." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 119, no. 1235, 2006, pp. U1997.
Robinson T, Simmons D, Scott D, et al. Ethnic differences in Type 2 diabetes care and outcomes in Auckland: a multiethnic community in New Zealand. N Z Med J. 2006;119(1235):U1997.
Robinson, T., Simmons, D., Scott, D., Howard, E., Pickering, K., Cutfield, R., Baker, J., Patel, A., Wellingham, J., & Morton, S. (2006). Ethnic differences in Type 2 diabetes care and outcomes in Auckland: a multiethnic community in New Zealand. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 119(1235), U1997.
Robinson T, et al. Ethnic Differences in Type 2 Diabetes Care and Outcomes in Auckland: a Multiethnic Community in New Zealand. N Z Med J. 2006 Jun 2;119(1235):U1997. PubMed PMID: 16751821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethnic differences in Type 2 diabetes care and outcomes in Auckland: a multiethnic community in New Zealand. AU - Robinson,Tom, AU - Simmons,David, AU - Scott,David, AU - Howard,Eileen, AU - Pickering,Karen, AU - Cutfield,Rick, AU - Baker,John, AU - Patel,Ashwin, AU - Wellingham,John, AU - Morton,Sara, Y1 - 2006/06/02/ PY - 2006/6/6/pubmed PY - 2006/6/24/medline PY - 2006/6/6/entrez SP - U1997 EP - U1997 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N Z Med J VL - 119 IS - 1235 N2 - INTRODUCTION: In New Zealand, Maori and Pacific (mostly of Samoan, Tongan, Niuean, or Cook Islands origin) people with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to suffer poor outcomes than other New Zealanders. Responsibility for addressing this outcome differential is falling on primary care and general practice in particular. This paper compares the general practice care provided to people with Type 2 diabetes in South and West Auckland, according to ethnicity. METHOD: An external audit of general practice diabetes care is carried out in South and West Auckland by the Diabetes Care Support Service. The results of 5917 routine patient audits carried out in 2003 are included in this study. Number of visits, recording of important information, risk factors, and treatments are compared between different ethnic groups. RESULTS: Maori and Pacific people with diabetes who attend a regular GP had a higher average number of consultations than Europeans (5.7, 5.4, and 4.8 visits per year respectively). They were as likely as Europeans to have undergone important regular examinations and investigations. Maori were more likely than Europeans to be on some treatments. However, Maori and Pacific people were more likely to have a range of adverse risk factors for diabetes complications than Europeans. These include being a smoker (35, 18, and 13% respectively), having an HbA1c greater than 8% (50, 56, 23%), and having microalbuminuria (55, 50, 27%). DISCUSSION: Although there were no large differences in the process measures of general practice diabetes care provided to different ethnic groups in South and West Auckland, Maori and Pacific people were not achieving the same outcomes of care in terms of risk factors for diabetes complications. Many of these risk factors are influenced by other factors in the wider community; however the New Zealand health system needs to consider how it can better address these differences. SN - 1175-8716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16751821/Ethnic_differences_in_Type_2_diabetes_care_and_outcomes_in_Auckland:_a_multiethnic_community_in_New_Zealand_ L2 - https://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2243 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -