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Surface plasmon resonance imaging on a microchip for detection of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles deposited onto the surface in a non-cross-linking configuration.
Anal Biochem. 2006 Aug 01; 355(1):125-31.AB

Abstract

Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with fully matched duplexes on their surfaces are selectively deposited onto walls of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels at high salt concentrations. In this study, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique was applied to monitor this phenomenon for improvement of detection sensitivity and elucidation of the phenomenon. The microchip was fabricated by bonding a surface-patterned PDMS plate and a gold thin film-deposited glass substrate. Probe oligonucleotide-modified GNPs were hybridized with target oligonucleotides to make fully matched or single-base-mismatched duplexes. The hybridized GNP solution was mixed with an NaCl solution in a Y-shaped microchannel. The deposition of the GNPs onto the gold sensor surface was detected by SPR imaging. Discrimination of the targets was possible with limit of detection of 32 nM (19 fmol) without temperature control in 5 min. Detailed analysis indicated that a seed layer of GNPs was initially adsorbed onto the sensor surface regardless of the target sequence. Therefore, in combination with a portable SPR device, the proposed method is promising for point-of-care testing of single-nucleotide polymorphsims.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16753128

Citation

Sato, Yasunobu, et al. "Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging On a Microchip for Detection of DNA-modified Gold Nanoparticles Deposited Onto the Surface in a Non-cross-linking Configuration." Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 355, no. 1, 2006, pp. 125-31.
Sato Y, Sato K, Hosokawa K, et al. Surface plasmon resonance imaging on a microchip for detection of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles deposited onto the surface in a non-cross-linking configuration. Anal Biochem. 2006;355(1):125-31.
Sato, Y., Sato, K., Hosokawa, K., & Maeda, M. (2006). Surface plasmon resonance imaging on a microchip for detection of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles deposited onto the surface in a non-cross-linking configuration. Analytical Biochemistry, 355(1), 125-31.
Sato Y, et al. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging On a Microchip for Detection of DNA-modified Gold Nanoparticles Deposited Onto the Surface in a Non-cross-linking Configuration. Anal Biochem. 2006 Aug 1;355(1):125-31. PubMed PMID: 16753128.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Surface plasmon resonance imaging on a microchip for detection of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles deposited onto the surface in a non-cross-linking configuration. AU - Sato,Yasunobu, AU - Sato,Kae, AU - Hosokawa,Kazuo, AU - Maeda,Mizuo, Y1 - 2006/05/19/ PY - 2006/02/17/received PY - 2006/04/07/revised PY - 2006/04/18/accepted PY - 2006/6/7/pubmed PY - 2006/9/19/medline PY - 2006/6/7/entrez SP - 125 EP - 31 JF - Analytical biochemistry JO - Anal Biochem VL - 355 IS - 1 N2 - Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with fully matched duplexes on their surfaces are selectively deposited onto walls of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels at high salt concentrations. In this study, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique was applied to monitor this phenomenon for improvement of detection sensitivity and elucidation of the phenomenon. The microchip was fabricated by bonding a surface-patterned PDMS plate and a gold thin film-deposited glass substrate. Probe oligonucleotide-modified GNPs were hybridized with target oligonucleotides to make fully matched or single-base-mismatched duplexes. The hybridized GNP solution was mixed with an NaCl solution in a Y-shaped microchannel. The deposition of the GNPs onto the gold sensor surface was detected by SPR imaging. Discrimination of the targets was possible with limit of detection of 32 nM (19 fmol) without temperature control in 5 min. Detailed analysis indicated that a seed layer of GNPs was initially adsorbed onto the sensor surface regardless of the target sequence. Therefore, in combination with a portable SPR device, the proposed method is promising for point-of-care testing of single-nucleotide polymorphsims. SN - 0003-2697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16753128/Surface_plasmon_resonance_imaging_on_a_microchip_for_detection_of_DNA_modified_gold_nanoparticles_deposited_onto_the_surface_in_a_non_cross_linking_configuration_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-2697(06)00297-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -