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Effect of high and low calcium diets on stone forming risk during liberal oxalate intake.
J Urol 2006; 176(1):132-6JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

Recent studies suggest that a high calcium diet protects against calcium oxalate stone formation. We compared the effect of high and low calcium diets on urinary saturation of calcium oxalate during liberal oxalate intake.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 10 healthy subjects (5 male, 5 female) participated in a 2-phase, randomized, crossover study comparing high (1,000 mg daily) and low (400 mg daily) calcium intake on a liberal oxalate diet (200 mg daily). During each phase subjects adhered to an instructed diet for 3 days followed by a controlled, metabolic diet for 4 days. Blood and 24-hour urine specimens collected on the last 2 days of each phase were analyzed for serum biochemistry studies and stone risk factors, respectively.

RESULTS

Urinary calcium was higher (mean +/- SD 171 +/- 64 vs 124 +/- 49 mg daily, p = 0.002) and oxalate was lower (25 +/- 4.8 vs 27 +/- 4 mg daily, p = 0.02) on the high vs low calcium diet. Overall, the urinary relative saturation ratio of calcium oxalate was higher on the high compared with the low calcium diet (3.3 vs 2.5, p <0.0001) even after adjusting for confounding variables.

CONCLUSIONS

In normal subjects urinary saturation of calcium oxalate was higher on a high calcium diet than a low calcium diet during liberal oxalate intake because the decrease in urinary oxalate did not overcome the effect of increased calcium. A high calcium diet during liberal oxalate intake may pose an increased risk of calcium oxalate stone formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16753387

Citation

Matsumoto, Edward D., et al. "Effect of High and Low Calcium Diets On Stone Forming Risk During Liberal Oxalate Intake." The Journal of Urology, vol. 176, no. 1, 2006, pp. 132-6.
Matsumoto ED, Heller HJ, Adams-Huet B, et al. Effect of high and low calcium diets on stone forming risk during liberal oxalate intake. J Urol. 2006;176(1):132-6.
Matsumoto, E. D., Heller, H. J., Adams-Huet, B., Brinkley, L. J., Pak, C. Y., & Pearle, M. S. (2006). Effect of high and low calcium diets on stone forming risk during liberal oxalate intake. The Journal of Urology, 176(1), pp. 132-6.
Matsumoto ED, et al. Effect of High and Low Calcium Diets On Stone Forming Risk During Liberal Oxalate Intake. J Urol. 2006;176(1):132-6. PubMed PMID: 16753387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of high and low calcium diets on stone forming risk during liberal oxalate intake. AU - Matsumoto,Edward D, AU - Heller,Howard J, AU - Adams-Huet,Beverley, AU - Brinkley,Linda J, AU - Pak,Charles Y C, AU - Pearle,Margaret S, PY - 2005/05/20/received PY - 2006/6/7/pubmed PY - 2006/7/28/medline PY - 2006/6/7/entrez SP - 132 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 176 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Recent studies suggest that a high calcium diet protects against calcium oxalate stone formation. We compared the effect of high and low calcium diets on urinary saturation of calcium oxalate during liberal oxalate intake. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 10 healthy subjects (5 male, 5 female) participated in a 2-phase, randomized, crossover study comparing high (1,000 mg daily) and low (400 mg daily) calcium intake on a liberal oxalate diet (200 mg daily). During each phase subjects adhered to an instructed diet for 3 days followed by a controlled, metabolic diet for 4 days. Blood and 24-hour urine specimens collected on the last 2 days of each phase were analyzed for serum biochemistry studies and stone risk factors, respectively. RESULTS: Urinary calcium was higher (mean +/- SD 171 +/- 64 vs 124 +/- 49 mg daily, p = 0.002) and oxalate was lower (25 +/- 4.8 vs 27 +/- 4 mg daily, p = 0.02) on the high vs low calcium diet. Overall, the urinary relative saturation ratio of calcium oxalate was higher on the high compared with the low calcium diet (3.3 vs 2.5, p <0.0001) even after adjusting for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS: In normal subjects urinary saturation of calcium oxalate was higher on a high calcium diet than a low calcium diet during liberal oxalate intake because the decrease in urinary oxalate did not overcome the effect of increased calcium. A high calcium diet during liberal oxalate intake may pose an increased risk of calcium oxalate stone formation. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16753387/Effect_of_high_and_low_calcium_diets_on_stone_forming_risk_during_liberal_oxalate_intake_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1016/S0022-5347(06)00565-9?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -