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Obesity among US urban preschool children: relationships to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Jun; 160(6):578-84.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity among preschool children and to determine whether these differences are explained by socioeconomic factors.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional assessment.

SETTING

Twenty large US cities, from 2001 to 2003.

PARTICIPANTS

Of the 4898 children enrolled at birth in the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, we analyzed data for the 2452 who, at the age of 3 years, had their height and weight measured during a maternal survey.

MAIN EXPOSURES

Three socioeconomic indicators were the main exposures-maternal education, household income, and children's food security status, as assessed by the US Household Food Security Survey Module.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Obesity, defined as a body mass index at the 95th percentile or higher for age and sex.

RESULTS

Of the mothers, 41.0% had education beyond high school, 52.9% of households had an income above the federal poverty threshold, and 79.5% of the children were food secure. The prevalence of obesity was 25.8% among Hispanics (any race), 16.2% among blacks, and 14.8% among whites. Compared with whites, the odds of obesity were significantly higher in Hispanics (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.73), but not in blacks (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.48). Neither of these odds ratios changed meaningfully after adjusting for all 3 socioeconomic indicators (Hispanics: odds ratio, 1.86 [95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.60]; and blacks: odds ratio, 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.47]).

CONCLUSION

In a sample of preschool children drawn from 20 large US cities, the high prevalence of obesity among Hispanics relative to blacks or whites was not explained by racial/ethnic differences in maternal education, household income, or food security.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mathematica Policy Research Inc., Princeton, NJ 08543, USA. rwhitaker@mathematica-mpr.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16754818

Citation

Whitaker, Robert C., and Sean M. Orzol. "Obesity Among US Urban Preschool Children: Relationships to Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 160, no. 6, 2006, pp. 578-84.
Whitaker RC, Orzol SM. Obesity among US urban preschool children: relationships to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(6):578-84.
Whitaker, R. C., & Orzol, S. M. (2006). Obesity among US urban preschool children: relationships to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 160(6), 578-84.
Whitaker RC, Orzol SM. Obesity Among US Urban Preschool Children: Relationships to Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(6):578-84. PubMed PMID: 16754818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity among US urban preschool children: relationships to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. AU - Whitaker,Robert C, AU - Orzol,Sean M, PY - 2006/6/7/pubmed PY - 2006/6/24/medline PY - 2006/6/7/entrez SP - 578 EP - 84 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 160 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity among preschool children and to determine whether these differences are explained by socioeconomic factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional assessment. SETTING: Twenty large US cities, from 2001 to 2003. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 4898 children enrolled at birth in the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, we analyzed data for the 2452 who, at the age of 3 years, had their height and weight measured during a maternal survey. MAIN EXPOSURES: Three socioeconomic indicators were the main exposures-maternal education, household income, and children's food security status, as assessed by the US Household Food Security Survey Module. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Obesity, defined as a body mass index at the 95th percentile or higher for age and sex. RESULTS: Of the mothers, 41.0% had education beyond high school, 52.9% of households had an income above the federal poverty threshold, and 79.5% of the children were food secure. The prevalence of obesity was 25.8% among Hispanics (any race), 16.2% among blacks, and 14.8% among whites. Compared with whites, the odds of obesity were significantly higher in Hispanics (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.73), but not in blacks (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.48). Neither of these odds ratios changed meaningfully after adjusting for all 3 socioeconomic indicators (Hispanics: odds ratio, 1.86 [95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.60]; and blacks: odds ratio, 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.47]). CONCLUSION: In a sample of preschool children drawn from 20 large US cities, the high prevalence of obesity among Hispanics relative to blacks or whites was not explained by racial/ethnic differences in maternal education, household income, or food security. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16754818/Obesity_among_US_urban_preschool_children:_relationships_to_race_ethnicity_and_socioeconomic_status_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.160.6.578 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -