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Maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress as predictors of infant-mother attachment security.
J Fam Psychol. 2006 Jun; 20(2):247-55.JF

Abstract

In considering Bowlby's (1969/1982) conceptualization of attachment as a "biobehavioral safety-regulating system," Goldberg, Grusec, & Jenkins (1999) proposed that maternal sensitivity to infant distress may be particularly relevant to the formation of a secure attachment relationship. Data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care provided a unique opportunity to address this question as maternal sensitivity to nondistress and distress were each coded for 357 mother-infant dyads at 6 months and 230 dyads at 15 months from videotaped observations of mother-infant play sessions. Attachment security was assessed in the Strange Situation at 15 months. Logistic regression analyses indicated that greater sensitivity to distress (but not greater sensitivity to nondistress) at 6 months was associated with increased odds of being classified as secure. The 15-month sensitivity measures were nonsignificant predictors of security. The results support the notion that the protective function of the child-mother attachment relationship may be especially salient during early infancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 904 W. Indiana Street, Urbana, IL 98195, USA. mcelwn@uiuc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16756400

Citation

McElwain, Nancy L., and Cathryn Booth-Laforce. "Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress as Predictors of Infant-mother Attachment Security." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 20, no. 2, 2006, pp. 247-55.
McElwain NL, Booth-Laforce C. Maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress as predictors of infant-mother attachment security. J Fam Psychol. 2006;20(2):247-55.
McElwain, N. L., & Booth-Laforce, C. (2006). Maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress as predictors of infant-mother attachment security. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 20(2), 247-55.
McElwain NL, Booth-Laforce C. Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress as Predictors of Infant-mother Attachment Security. J Fam Psychol. 2006;20(2):247-55. PubMed PMID: 16756400.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress as predictors of infant-mother attachment security. AU - McElwain,Nancy L, AU - Booth-Laforce,Cathryn, PY - 2006/6/8/pubmed PY - 2006/7/26/medline PY - 2006/6/8/entrez SP - 247 EP - 55 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - In considering Bowlby's (1969/1982) conceptualization of attachment as a "biobehavioral safety-regulating system," Goldberg, Grusec, & Jenkins (1999) proposed that maternal sensitivity to infant distress may be particularly relevant to the formation of a secure attachment relationship. Data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care provided a unique opportunity to address this question as maternal sensitivity to nondistress and distress were each coded for 357 mother-infant dyads at 6 months and 230 dyads at 15 months from videotaped observations of mother-infant play sessions. Attachment security was assessed in the Strange Situation at 15 months. Logistic regression analyses indicated that greater sensitivity to distress (but not greater sensitivity to nondistress) at 6 months was associated with increased odds of being classified as secure. The 15-month sensitivity measures were nonsignificant predictors of security. The results support the notion that the protective function of the child-mother attachment relationship may be especially salient during early infancy. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16756400/Maternal_sensitivity_to_infant_distress_and_nondistress_as_predictors_of_infant_mother_attachment_security_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/20/2/247 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -