Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs.
Clin Infect Dis 2006; 43(1):67-71CI

Abstract

US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Military Infectious Diseases Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5012, USA. lynn.kitchen@amedd.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16758420

Citation

Kitchen, Lynn W., et al. "Role of US Military Research Programs in the Development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved Antimalarial Drugs." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 43, no. 1, 2006, pp. 67-71.
Kitchen LW, Vaughn DW, Skillman DR. Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs. Clin Infect Dis. 2006;43(1):67-71.
Kitchen, L. W., Vaughn, D. W., & Skillman, D. R. (2006). Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 43(1), pp. 67-71.
Kitchen LW, Vaughn DW, Skillman DR. Role of US Military Research Programs in the Development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved Antimalarial Drugs. Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Jul 1;43(1):67-71. PubMed PMID: 16758420.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs. AU - Kitchen,Lynn W, AU - Vaughn,David W, AU - Skillman,Donald R, Y1 - 2006/05/24/ PY - 2005/12/27/received PY - 2006/03/01/accepted PY - 2006/6/8/pubmed PY - 2006/8/23/medline PY - 2006/6/8/entrez SP - 67 EP - 71 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16758420/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/504873 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -