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Olfactory-tactile compatibility effects demonstrated using a variation of the Implicit Association Test.
Acta Psychol (Amst). 2007 Mar; 124(3):332-43.AP

Abstract

We investigated whether the crossmodal associations between olfaction and touch reported previously in studies involving subjective report measures could also be demonstrated using an indirect measure of crossmodal association. To this end, we used a modified version of the Implicit Association Test. The participants had to make speeded discrimination responses to a series of unimodally presented olfactory (lemon vs. animal odour) or tactile stimuli (soft vs. rough fabric) using two response keys. In compatible blocks of trials, the olfactory and tactile stimuli that were mapped onto the same response key were considered to share a stronger association (e.g., the lemon odour and the soft fabric) than those that were combined onto the same response key in the incompatible blocks of trials (e.g., the animal odour and the soft fabric). The results showed that the participants responded significantly more rapidly in the compatible response mapping blocks than in the incompatible blocks, thus confirming the existence of associations between the stimuli that were considered to be compatible. These results provide the first empirical evidence that olfactory-tactile crossmodal associations are stable enough to influence performance even when not directly relevant to a participant's task.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK. dematte@form.unitn.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16762303

Citation

Luisa Demattè, M, et al. "Olfactory-tactile Compatibility Effects Demonstrated Using a Variation of the Implicit Association Test." Acta Psychologica, vol. 124, no. 3, 2007, pp. 332-43.
Luisa Demattè M, Sanabria D, Spence C. Olfactory-tactile compatibility effects demonstrated using a variation of the Implicit Association Test. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2007;124(3):332-43.
Luisa Demattè, M., Sanabria, D., & Spence, C. (2007). Olfactory-tactile compatibility effects demonstrated using a variation of the Implicit Association Test. Acta Psychologica, 124(3), 332-43.
Luisa Demattè M, Sanabria D, Spence C. Olfactory-tactile Compatibility Effects Demonstrated Using a Variation of the Implicit Association Test. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2007;124(3):332-43. PubMed PMID: 16762303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Olfactory-tactile compatibility effects demonstrated using a variation of the Implicit Association Test. AU - Luisa Demattè,M, AU - Sanabria,Daniel, AU - Spence,Charles, Y1 - 2006/06/09/ PY - 2006/01/26/received PY - 2006/04/13/revised PY - 2006/04/13/accepted PY - 2006/6/10/pubmed PY - 2007/5/26/medline PY - 2006/6/10/entrez SP - 332 EP - 43 JF - Acta psychologica JO - Acta Psychol (Amst) VL - 124 IS - 3 N2 - We investigated whether the crossmodal associations between olfaction and touch reported previously in studies involving subjective report measures could also be demonstrated using an indirect measure of crossmodal association. To this end, we used a modified version of the Implicit Association Test. The participants had to make speeded discrimination responses to a series of unimodally presented olfactory (lemon vs. animal odour) or tactile stimuli (soft vs. rough fabric) using two response keys. In compatible blocks of trials, the olfactory and tactile stimuli that were mapped onto the same response key were considered to share a stronger association (e.g., the lemon odour and the soft fabric) than those that were combined onto the same response key in the incompatible blocks of trials (e.g., the animal odour and the soft fabric). The results showed that the participants responded significantly more rapidly in the compatible response mapping blocks than in the incompatible blocks, thus confirming the existence of associations between the stimuli that were considered to be compatible. These results provide the first empirical evidence that olfactory-tactile crossmodal associations are stable enough to influence performance even when not directly relevant to a participant's task. SN - 0001-6918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16762303/Olfactory_tactile_compatibility_effects_demonstrated_using_a_variation_of_the_Implicit_Association_Test_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-6918(06)00052-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -