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Saturation of retinol-binding protein correlates closely to the severity of alcohol-induced liver disease.
Alcohol. 2006 Jan; 38(1):37-43.A

Abstract

Impaired metabolism of retinol has been shown to occur in alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the saturation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) in 6 patients with different stages of ALD. Hospitalized alcohol consumers (n=118) with different stages of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and 45 healthy control subjects were nutritionally assessed, and retinol and RBP content was measured in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods, respectively. No differences were noted in daily retinol intake, but subjects with ALD had significantly lower concentrations of retinol in plasma (ALD1: 1.81+/-0.17 micromol/l [mean+/-S.E.M.]; ALD2: 1.95+/-0.24 micromol/l; ALD3: 0.67+/-0.13 micromol/l) compared to controls (2.76+/-0.19 micromol/l). Subjects of group ALD2 had significantly higher plasma RBP levels than controls (P<.05) and patients with ALD1 (P<.05) and ALD3 (P<.001). The relative saturation of RBP with retinol decreased with severity of ALD (controls: 76.8+/-5.0%; ALD1: 55.8+/-6.5%; ALD2: 43.5+/-6.2%; ALD3: 29.0+/-5.1%). The present study indicates that plasma concentrations of retinol and RBP per se do not correlate to severity of ALD, but rather that the retinol/RBP ratio links to the severity of alcohol-induced liver damage. From these results, a reduced availability of retinol in the periphery due to an altered saturation of RBP can be concluded.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology of Nutrition and Gender Research, Hohenheim University (140e), Garbenstrasse 28, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16762690

Citation

Wagnerberger, Sabine, et al. "Saturation of Retinol-binding Protein Correlates Closely to the Severity of Alcohol-induced Liver Disease." Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.), vol. 38, no. 1, 2006, pp. 37-43.
Wagnerberger S, Schäfer C, Bode C, et al. Saturation of retinol-binding protein correlates closely to the severity of alcohol-induced liver disease. Alcohol. 2006;38(1):37-43.
Wagnerberger, S., Schäfer, C., Bode, C., & Parlesak, A. (2006). Saturation of retinol-binding protein correlates closely to the severity of alcohol-induced liver disease. Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.), 38(1), 37-43.
Wagnerberger S, et al. Saturation of Retinol-binding Protein Correlates Closely to the Severity of Alcohol-induced Liver Disease. Alcohol. 2006;38(1):37-43. PubMed PMID: 16762690.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Saturation of retinol-binding protein correlates closely to the severity of alcohol-induced liver disease. AU - Wagnerberger,Sabine, AU - Schäfer,Christian, AU - Bode,Christiane, AU - Parlesak,Alexandr, PY - 2006/02/22/received PY - 2006/03/29/revised PY - 2006/03/31/accepted PY - 2006/6/10/pubmed PY - 2006/8/10/medline PY - 2006/6/10/entrez SP - 37 EP - 43 JF - Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.) JO - Alcohol VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - Impaired metabolism of retinol has been shown to occur in alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the saturation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) in 6 patients with different stages of ALD. Hospitalized alcohol consumers (n=118) with different stages of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and 45 healthy control subjects were nutritionally assessed, and retinol and RBP content was measured in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods, respectively. No differences were noted in daily retinol intake, but subjects with ALD had significantly lower concentrations of retinol in plasma (ALD1: 1.81+/-0.17 micromol/l [mean+/-S.E.M.]; ALD2: 1.95+/-0.24 micromol/l; ALD3: 0.67+/-0.13 micromol/l) compared to controls (2.76+/-0.19 micromol/l). Subjects of group ALD2 had significantly higher plasma RBP levels than controls (P<.05) and patients with ALD1 (P<.05) and ALD3 (P<.001). The relative saturation of RBP with retinol decreased with severity of ALD (controls: 76.8+/-5.0%; ALD1: 55.8+/-6.5%; ALD2: 43.5+/-6.2%; ALD3: 29.0+/-5.1%). The present study indicates that plasma concentrations of retinol and RBP per se do not correlate to severity of ALD, but rather that the retinol/RBP ratio links to the severity of alcohol-induced liver damage. From these results, a reduced availability of retinol in the periphery due to an altered saturation of RBP can be concluded. SN - 0741-8329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16762690/Saturation_of_retinol_binding_protein_correlates_closely_to_the_severity_of_alcohol_induced_liver_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-8329(06)00046-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -