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To PEG or not to PEG: a review of evidence for placing feeding tubes in advanced dementia and the decision-making process.
Geriatrics. 2006 Jun; 61(6):30-5.G

Abstract

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has evolved into a common low-risk procedure in current medical practice. Clinical evidence supporting the use of tube feedings in patients with advanced dementia is clearly lacking, yet PEG procedures continue to be performed in a large number of these cases. In fact, multiple studies have shown that feeding tubes seldom are effective in improving nutrition, maintaining skin integrity by increased protein intake, preventing aspiration pneumonia, minimizing suffering, improving functional status, or extending life. The decision-making process is complicated, however, and involves the clinician considering such issues as advance directives, ethical considerations, legal/financial concerns, emotional factors, cultural background, religious beliefs, and the need for a family meeting incorporating all of these principles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State University of New York at Stony Brook; Long Island State Veterans Home, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16768542

Citation

Cervo, Frank A., et al. "To PEG or Not to PEG: a Review of Evidence for Placing Feeding Tubes in Advanced Dementia and the Decision-making Process." Geriatrics, vol. 61, no. 6, 2006, pp. 30-5.
Cervo FA, Bryan L, Farber S. To PEG or not to PEG: a review of evidence for placing feeding tubes in advanced dementia and the decision-making process. Geriatrics. 2006;61(6):30-5.
Cervo, F. A., Bryan, L., & Farber, S. (2006). To PEG or not to PEG: a review of evidence for placing feeding tubes in advanced dementia and the decision-making process. Geriatrics, 61(6), 30-5.
Cervo FA, Bryan L, Farber S. To PEG or Not to PEG: a Review of Evidence for Placing Feeding Tubes in Advanced Dementia and the Decision-making Process. Geriatrics. 2006;61(6):30-5. PubMed PMID: 16768542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - To PEG or not to PEG: a review of evidence for placing feeding tubes in advanced dementia and the decision-making process. AU - Cervo,Frank A, AU - Bryan,Leslie, AU - Farber,Sharon, PY - 2006/6/14/pubmed PY - 2006/8/2/medline PY - 2006/6/14/entrez SP - 30 EP - 5 JF - Geriatrics JO - Geriatrics VL - 61 IS - 6 N2 - Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has evolved into a common low-risk procedure in current medical practice. Clinical evidence supporting the use of tube feedings in patients with advanced dementia is clearly lacking, yet PEG procedures continue to be performed in a large number of these cases. In fact, multiple studies have shown that feeding tubes seldom are effective in improving nutrition, maintaining skin integrity by increased protein intake, preventing aspiration pneumonia, minimizing suffering, improving functional status, or extending life. The decision-making process is complicated, however, and involves the clinician considering such issues as advance directives, ethical considerations, legal/financial concerns, emotional factors, cultural background, religious beliefs, and the need for a family meeting incorporating all of these principles. SN - 0016-867X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16768542/To_PEG_or_not_to_PEG:_a_review_of_evidence_for_placing_feeding_tubes_in_advanced_dementia_and_the_decision_making_process_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dementia.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -