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Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample.
Emotion. 2006 May; 6(2):330-4.E

Abstract

The authors used a representative national sample (N = 777) to test the evolutionary hypothesis that men would be more bothered by sexual infidelity and women by emotional infidelity, the Jealousy as a Specific Innate Module (JSIM) effect. Our alternative conceptualization of jealousy suggests that there are distinct emotional components of jealousy that did not evolve differently by gender. The authors looked for effects of age, socioeconomic status (SES), and type of measure (continuous or dichotomous) on jealousy. The authors did not find age or SES effects. Forced-choice items provided support for our alternative view; both genders showed more anger and blame over sexual infidelity but more hurt feelings over emotional infidelity. Continuous measures indicated more emotional response to sexual than emotional infidelity among both genders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3270, USA. mcgreen@email.unc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16768565

Citation

Green, Melanie C., and John Sabini. "Gender, Socioeconomic Status, Age, and Jealousy: Emotional Responses to Infidelity in a National Sample." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 6, no. 2, 2006, pp. 330-4.
Green MC, Sabini J. Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample. Emotion. 2006;6(2):330-4.
Green, M. C., & Sabini, J. (2006). Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 6(2), 330-4.
Green MC, Sabini J. Gender, Socioeconomic Status, Age, and Jealousy: Emotional Responses to Infidelity in a National Sample. Emotion. 2006;6(2):330-4. PubMed PMID: 16768565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample. AU - Green,Melanie C, AU - Sabini,John, PY - 2006/6/14/pubmed PY - 2006/11/1/medline PY - 2006/6/14/entrez SP - 330 EP - 4 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - The authors used a representative national sample (N = 777) to test the evolutionary hypothesis that men would be more bothered by sexual infidelity and women by emotional infidelity, the Jealousy as a Specific Innate Module (JSIM) effect. Our alternative conceptualization of jealousy suggests that there are distinct emotional components of jealousy that did not evolve differently by gender. The authors looked for effects of age, socioeconomic status (SES), and type of measure (continuous or dichotomous) on jealousy. The authors did not find age or SES effects. Forced-choice items provided support for our alternative view; both genders showed more anger and blame over sexual infidelity but more hurt feelings over emotional infidelity. Continuous measures indicated more emotional response to sexual than emotional infidelity among both genders. SN - 1528-3542 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16768565/Gender_socioeconomic_status_age_and_jealousy:_emotional_responses_to_infidelity_in_a_national_sample_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -