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Yersinia enterocolitica infection mimicking surgical conditions.
Pediatr Surg Int. 2006 Jul; 22(7):589-92.PS

Abstract

Yersinia enteritis may present with alarming gastrointestinal manifestations. The aim of this study was to review the cases of children admitted to a general hospital with a preliminary diagnosis of surgical nature and subsequently proven to be infected by Yersinia enterocolitica. All cases of children aged less than 14 years with stool cultures positive for Y. enterocolitica during the 12-year period January 1993 through December 2004 were analyzed. Y. enterocolitica was isolated from the stools of 71 children with gastrointestinal manifestations; 27 children were treated as outpatients and 44 were hospitalized. Six were admitted to the Pediatric Surgery Department (13.6% of the total hospitalizations and 8.4% of all Y. enterocolitica cases). Four of the Pediatric Surgery patients presented with abdominal pain and right lower quadrant tenderness. The preliminary diagnosis of appendicitis was excluded during hospitalization and none of them underwent appendectomy. The other two children were admitted for vomiting initially attributed to a preceding head injury and for diarrhea and a perianal abscess. Two children were given antibiotics and all had an excellent outcome. Y. enterocolitica enteritis manifestations can infrequently mimic appendicitis or other surgical conditions but should remain in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with an acute abdomen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece. perdiko@med.uoc.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16770604

Citation

Perdikogianni, Chryssoula, et al. "Yersinia Enterocolitica Infection Mimicking Surgical Conditions." Pediatric Surgery International, vol. 22, no. 7, 2006, pp. 589-92.
Perdikogianni C, Galanakis E, Michalakis M, et al. Yersinia enterocolitica infection mimicking surgical conditions. Pediatr Surg Int. 2006;22(7):589-92.
Perdikogianni, C., Galanakis, E., Michalakis, M., Giannoussi, E., Maraki, S., Tselentis, Y., & Charissis, G. (2006). Yersinia enterocolitica infection mimicking surgical conditions. Pediatric Surgery International, 22(7), 589-92.
Perdikogianni C, et al. Yersinia Enterocolitica Infection Mimicking Surgical Conditions. Pediatr Surg Int. 2006;22(7):589-92. PubMed PMID: 16770604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Yersinia enterocolitica infection mimicking surgical conditions. AU - Perdikogianni,Chryssoula, AU - Galanakis,Emmanouil, AU - Michalakis,Michael, AU - Giannoussi,Elizabeth, AU - Maraki,Sophia, AU - Tselentis,Yiannis, AU - Charissis,George, Y1 - 2006/06/13/ PY - 2006/05/08/accepted PY - 2006/6/14/pubmed PY - 2007/2/23/medline PY - 2006/6/14/entrez SP - 589 EP - 92 JF - Pediatric surgery international JO - Pediatr. Surg. Int. VL - 22 IS - 7 N2 - Yersinia enteritis may present with alarming gastrointestinal manifestations. The aim of this study was to review the cases of children admitted to a general hospital with a preliminary diagnosis of surgical nature and subsequently proven to be infected by Yersinia enterocolitica. All cases of children aged less than 14 years with stool cultures positive for Y. enterocolitica during the 12-year period January 1993 through December 2004 were analyzed. Y. enterocolitica was isolated from the stools of 71 children with gastrointestinal manifestations; 27 children were treated as outpatients and 44 were hospitalized. Six were admitted to the Pediatric Surgery Department (13.6% of the total hospitalizations and 8.4% of all Y. enterocolitica cases). Four of the Pediatric Surgery patients presented with abdominal pain and right lower quadrant tenderness. The preliminary diagnosis of appendicitis was excluded during hospitalization and none of them underwent appendectomy. The other two children were admitted for vomiting initially attributed to a preceding head injury and for diarrhea and a perianal abscess. Two children were given antibiotics and all had an excellent outcome. Y. enterocolitica enteritis manifestations can infrequently mimic appendicitis or other surgical conditions but should remain in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with an acute abdomen. SN - 0179-0358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16770604/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-006-1703-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -