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Negotiating improved case management of childhood illness with formal and informal private practitioners in Uganda.
Trop Med Int Health. 2006 Jun; 11(6):967-73.TM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

In Uganda, formal and informal private practitioners (PPs) provide most case management for childhood illness. This paper describes the impact of negotiation sessions, an intervention to improve the quality of PPs' case management of childhood diarrhoea, acute respiratory infection and malaria in a rural district in Uganda.

METHOD

Negotiation sessions targeted PPs working at private clinics and drug shops. The aim was to improve key practices extracted from the national Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Guidelines, and to measure the PPs' performance before and after the intervention.

RESULTS

Post-intervention the quality of case management for childhood diarrhoea, acute respiratory infection and malaria was generally better, although certain practices appeared resistant to change. We discovered various types of PPs who were mostly unregistered by the district authorities.

CONCLUSIONS

Results suggest the importance of maintaining ongoing monitoring and support to PPs to understand barriers to change and to encourage more practice improvement. Modifications to the intervention are needed to take it to scale and render it more sustainable. Getting local organizations and professional associations more involved could make it easier to establish and maintain contact with PPs. The government needs to simplify registration procedures and reduce associated fees to encourage PPs to register and thus be included in a large-scale intervention. Future interventions need to measure the impact on improving childhood case management at the community/household level.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USAID, Washington DC 20523-3700, WA, USA. ytawfik@usaid.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16772020

Citation

Tawfik, Youssef, et al. "Negotiating Improved Case Management of Childhood Illness With Formal and Informal Private Practitioners in Uganda." Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, vol. 11, no. 6, 2006, pp. 967-73.
Tawfik Y, Nsungwa-Sabitii J, Greer G, et al. Negotiating improved case management of childhood illness with formal and informal private practitioners in Uganda. Trop Med Int Health. 2006;11(6):967-73.
Tawfik, Y., Nsungwa-Sabitii, J., Greer, G., Owor, J., Kesande, R., & Prysor-Jones, S. (2006). Negotiating improved case management of childhood illness with formal and informal private practitioners in Uganda. Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, 11(6), 967-73.
Tawfik Y, et al. Negotiating Improved Case Management of Childhood Illness With Formal and Informal Private Practitioners in Uganda. Trop Med Int Health. 2006;11(6):967-73. PubMed PMID: 16772020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Negotiating improved case management of childhood illness with formal and informal private practitioners in Uganda. AU - Tawfik,Youssef, AU - Nsungwa-Sabitii,Jesca, AU - Greer,George, AU - Owor,Joseph, AU - Kesande,Rosette, AU - Prysor-Jones,Suzanne, PY - 2006/6/15/pubmed PY - 2006/7/25/medline PY - 2006/6/15/entrez SP - 967 EP - 73 JF - Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH JO - Trop Med Int Health VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: In Uganda, formal and informal private practitioners (PPs) provide most case management for childhood illness. This paper describes the impact of negotiation sessions, an intervention to improve the quality of PPs' case management of childhood diarrhoea, acute respiratory infection and malaria in a rural district in Uganda. METHOD: Negotiation sessions targeted PPs working at private clinics and drug shops. The aim was to improve key practices extracted from the national Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Guidelines, and to measure the PPs' performance before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Post-intervention the quality of case management for childhood diarrhoea, acute respiratory infection and malaria was generally better, although certain practices appeared resistant to change. We discovered various types of PPs who were mostly unregistered by the district authorities. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest the importance of maintaining ongoing monitoring and support to PPs to understand barriers to change and to encourage more practice improvement. Modifications to the intervention are needed to take it to scale and render it more sustainable. Getting local organizations and professional associations more involved could make it easier to establish and maintain contact with PPs. The government needs to simplify registration procedures and reduce associated fees to encourage PPs to register and thus be included in a large-scale intervention. Future interventions need to measure the impact on improving childhood case management at the community/household level. SN - 1360-2276 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16772020/Negotiating_improved_case_management_of_childhood_illness_with_formal_and_informal_private_practitioners_in_Uganda_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2006.01622.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -