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Comparison of risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in black and white adults.
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Jun 12; 166(11):1196-202.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent attention to racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes highlights the excess coronary heart disease mortality in black patients compared with white patients. We investigated whether traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were similarly associated with CVD mortality in black and white men and women.

METHODS

Participants included 3741 black and 33,246 white men and women (44%) without a history of myocardial infarction, aged 18 to 64 years at baseline (1967-1973) from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study. Blood pressure, total cholesterol level, body mass index, cigarette smoking, and physician-diagnosed diabetes were assessed at baseline using standard methods.

RESULTS

Through 2002, there were 107, 1586, 177, and 2866 deaths from CVD in black women, white women, black men, and white men, respectively. In general, the magnitude and direction of associations between traditional risk factors and CVD mortality were similar by race. However, in black women the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 12 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-1.29), whereas it was 1.31 in white women (95% CI, 1.25-1.38). There was no association between higher cholesterol level (per 40 mg/dL [1.04 mmol/L]) and CVD mortality in black men (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.80-1.10), whereas the risk was elevated in white men (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.16-1.26).

CONCLUSIONS

Most traditional risk factors demonstrated similar associations with mortality in black and white adults of the same sex. Small differences were primarily in the strength, not the direction, of association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill 60611, USA. Carnethon@northwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16772247

Citation

Carnethon, Mercedes R., et al. "Comparison of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Mortality in Black and White Adults." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 166, no. 11, 2006, pp. 1196-202.
Carnethon MR, Lynch EB, Dyer AR, et al. Comparison of risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in black and white adults. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(11):1196-202.
Carnethon, M. R., Lynch, E. B., Dyer, A. R., Lloyd-Jones, D. M., Wang, R., Garside, D. B., & Greenland, P. (2006). Comparison of risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in black and white adults. Archives of Internal Medicine, 166(11), 1196-202.
Carnethon MR, et al. Comparison of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Mortality in Black and White Adults. Arch Intern Med. 2006 Jun 12;166(11):1196-202. PubMed PMID: 16772247.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in black and white adults. AU - Carnethon,Mercedes R, AU - Lynch,Elizabeth B, AU - Dyer,Alan R, AU - Lloyd-Jones,Donald M, AU - Wang,Renwei, AU - Garside,Daniel B, AU - Greenland,Philip, PY - 2006/6/15/pubmed PY - 2006/8/5/medline PY - 2006/6/15/entrez SP - 1196 EP - 202 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 166 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent attention to racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes highlights the excess coronary heart disease mortality in black patients compared with white patients. We investigated whether traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were similarly associated with CVD mortality in black and white men and women. METHODS: Participants included 3741 black and 33,246 white men and women (44%) without a history of myocardial infarction, aged 18 to 64 years at baseline (1967-1973) from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study. Blood pressure, total cholesterol level, body mass index, cigarette smoking, and physician-diagnosed diabetes were assessed at baseline using standard methods. RESULTS: Through 2002, there were 107, 1586, 177, and 2866 deaths from CVD in black women, white women, black men, and white men, respectively. In general, the magnitude and direction of associations between traditional risk factors and CVD mortality were similar by race. However, in black women the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 12 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-1.29), whereas it was 1.31 in white women (95% CI, 1.25-1.38). There was no association between higher cholesterol level (per 40 mg/dL [1.04 mmol/L]) and CVD mortality in black men (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.80-1.10), whereas the risk was elevated in white men (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.16-1.26). CONCLUSIONS: Most traditional risk factors demonstrated similar associations with mortality in black and white adults of the same sex. Small differences were primarily in the strength, not the direction, of association. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16772247/Comparison_of_risk_factors_for_cardiovascular_mortality_in_black_and_white_adults_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.166.11.1196 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -