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Genetic and environmental influences on insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and obesity in twins.
Sleep 2006; 29(5):645-9S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

To better understand the relationships of insomnia, sleepiness, and obesity.

DESIGN

Classic twin study.

SETTING

A community-based twin registry in Washington State.

PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS

One thousand forty-two monozygotic and 828 dizygotic twin pairs participating in the University of Washington Twin Registry.

INTERVENTIONS

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS

Twins were, on average, 32 years old; 61% were women, and 19.5% were obese, defined as a body mass index > or = 28. Insomnia and sleepiness were endorsed by 19.3% and 3.7% of twins, respectively. Twin correlations were higher in monozygotic than dizygotic twins for insomnia (0.47 versus 0.15), sleepiness (0.37 versus 0.14), and obesity (0.82 versus 0.46). Heritability estimates were 57% for insomnia (p < .001; 95% confidence interval 47-63), 38% for sleepiness (p < .01; 95% confidence interval 16-46), and 73% for obesity (p < .001; 95% confidence interval 49-87). Multivariate genetic model fitting revealed that common additive genetic effects comprised 12.8% of the phenotypic correlation between insomnia and sleepiness (p < .01) and 10% of the phenotypic correlation between insomnia and obesity (p < .01). The phenotypic correlation between sleepiness and obesity was not due to common additive genetic effects.

CONCLUSIONS

Insomnia, sleepiness, and obesity are under strong genetic influence. Common genetic effects were observed between insomnia and both sleepiness and obesity, suggesting shared genetic contributions to these phenomena.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurlogy, University of Washington Sleep Disorders Center at Harborview, Box 359803, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104-2499, USA. nwatson@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16774154

Citation

Watson, Nathaniel F., et al. "Genetic and Environmental Influences On Insomnia, Daytime Sleepiness, and Obesity in Twins." Sleep, vol. 29, no. 5, 2006, pp. 645-9.
Watson NF, Goldberg J, Arguelles L, et al. Genetic and environmental influences on insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and obesity in twins. Sleep. 2006;29(5):645-9.
Watson, N. F., Goldberg, J., Arguelles, L., & Buchwald, D. (2006). Genetic and environmental influences on insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and obesity in twins. Sleep, 29(5), pp. 645-9.
Watson NF, et al. Genetic and Environmental Influences On Insomnia, Daytime Sleepiness, and Obesity in Twins. Sleep. 2006;29(5):645-9. PubMed PMID: 16774154.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic and environmental influences on insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and obesity in twins. AU - Watson,Nathaniel F, AU - Goldberg,Jack, AU - Arguelles,Lester, AU - Buchwald,Dedra, PY - 2006/6/16/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/6/16/entrez SP - 645 EP - 9 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 29 IS - 5 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: To better understand the relationships of insomnia, sleepiness, and obesity. DESIGN: Classic twin study. SETTING: A community-based twin registry in Washington State. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS: One thousand forty-two monozygotic and 828 dizygotic twin pairs participating in the University of Washington Twin Registry. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Twins were, on average, 32 years old; 61% were women, and 19.5% were obese, defined as a body mass index > or = 28. Insomnia and sleepiness were endorsed by 19.3% and 3.7% of twins, respectively. Twin correlations were higher in monozygotic than dizygotic twins for insomnia (0.47 versus 0.15), sleepiness (0.37 versus 0.14), and obesity (0.82 versus 0.46). Heritability estimates were 57% for insomnia (p < .001; 95% confidence interval 47-63), 38% for sleepiness (p < .01; 95% confidence interval 16-46), and 73% for obesity (p < .001; 95% confidence interval 49-87). Multivariate genetic model fitting revealed that common additive genetic effects comprised 12.8% of the phenotypic correlation between insomnia and sleepiness (p < .01) and 10% of the phenotypic correlation between insomnia and obesity (p < .01). The phenotypic correlation between sleepiness and obesity was not due to common additive genetic effects. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia, sleepiness, and obesity are under strong genetic influence. Common genetic effects were observed between insomnia and both sleepiness and obesity, suggesting shared genetic contributions to these phenomena. SN - 0161-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16774154/Genetic_and_environmental_influences_on_insomnia_daytime_sleepiness_and_obesity_in_twins_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sleep/29.5.645 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -