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Meat mutagens and risk of distal colon adenoma in a cohort of U.S. men.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jun; 15(6):1120-5.CE

Abstract

Cooking meats at high temperatures and for long duration produces heterocyclic amines and other mutagens. These meat-derived mutagenic compounds have been hypothesized to increase risk of colorectal neoplasia, but prospective data are unavailable. We examined the association between intakes of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5,-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5,-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx), and meat-derived mutagenicity (MDM) and risk of distal colon adenoma using a cooking method questionnaire administered in 1996 in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort. Between 1996 and 2002, 581 distal colon adenoma cases were identified. Higher intake of MDM was marginally associated with increased risk of distal adenoma [fourth versus lowest quintile: odds ratio (OR), 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-1.84; highest versus lowest quintile: OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.97-1.72; P(trend) = 0.08]. Adjusting for total red meat or processed meat intake did not explain those associations. Our data also suggested a positive association between higher MeIQx (highest versus lowest quintile: OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71; P(trend) = 0.22) and risk of adenoma, but this association was attenuated after adjusting for processed meat intake. DiMeIQx and PhIP did not seem to be associated with risk of adenoma. In conclusion, higher consumption of mutagens from meats cooked at higher temperature and longer duration may be associated with higher risk of distal colon adenoma independent of overall meat intake. Because mutagens other than heterocyclic amines also contribute to MDM, our results suggest that mutagens other than heterocyclic amines in cooked meats may also play a role in increasing the risk of distal adenoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Building 2, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kana.wu@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16775169

Citation

Wu, Kana, et al. "Meat Mutagens and Risk of Distal Colon Adenoma in a Cohort of U.S. Men." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 15, no. 6, 2006, pp. 1120-5.
Wu K, Giovannucci E, Byrne C, et al. Meat mutagens and risk of distal colon adenoma in a cohort of U.S. men. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(6):1120-5.
Wu, K., Giovannucci, E., Byrne, C., Platz, E. A., Fuchs, C., Willett, W. C., & Sinha, R. (2006). Meat mutagens and risk of distal colon adenoma in a cohort of U.S. men. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 15(6), 1120-5.
Wu K, et al. Meat Mutagens and Risk of Distal Colon Adenoma in a Cohort of U.S. Men. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(6):1120-5. PubMed PMID: 16775169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat mutagens and risk of distal colon adenoma in a cohort of U.S. men. AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Byrne,Celia, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, AU - Fuchs,Charles, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Sinha,Rashmi, PY - 2006/6/16/pubmed PY - 2006/11/3/medline PY - 2006/6/16/entrez SP - 1120 EP - 5 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 15 IS - 6 N2 - Cooking meats at high temperatures and for long duration produces heterocyclic amines and other mutagens. These meat-derived mutagenic compounds have been hypothesized to increase risk of colorectal neoplasia, but prospective data are unavailable. We examined the association between intakes of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5,-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5,-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx), and meat-derived mutagenicity (MDM) and risk of distal colon adenoma using a cooking method questionnaire administered in 1996 in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort. Between 1996 and 2002, 581 distal colon adenoma cases were identified. Higher intake of MDM was marginally associated with increased risk of distal adenoma [fourth versus lowest quintile: odds ratio (OR), 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-1.84; highest versus lowest quintile: OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.97-1.72; P(trend) = 0.08]. Adjusting for total red meat or processed meat intake did not explain those associations. Our data also suggested a positive association between higher MeIQx (highest versus lowest quintile: OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71; P(trend) = 0.22) and risk of adenoma, but this association was attenuated after adjusting for processed meat intake. DiMeIQx and PhIP did not seem to be associated with risk of adenoma. In conclusion, higher consumption of mutagens from meats cooked at higher temperature and longer duration may be associated with higher risk of distal colon adenoma independent of overall meat intake. Because mutagens other than heterocyclic amines also contribute to MDM, our results suggest that mutagens other than heterocyclic amines in cooked meats may also play a role in increasing the risk of distal adenoma. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16775169/Meat_mutagens_and_risk_of_distal_colon_adenoma_in_a_cohort_of_U_S__men_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16775169 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -