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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the metabolic syndrome.
Minerva Cardioangiol. 2006 Apr; 54(2):229-39.MC

Abstract

In the last 15 years evidence has been accumulating suggesting that hepatic steatosis may be the starting point for a progressive liver disease. Nonalcoholic steatosis (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD) is now considered a metabolic pathway to advanced liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver disease of other etiology, namely hepatitis C virus, may interact with NAFLD, although the underlying mechanism(s) have not been fully elucidated. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and dyslipidemia are the principal factors associated with NAFLD, which is now considered the hepatic expression of metabolic syndrome (MS). Several studies have dealt with the relationship of NAFLD and MS, the risk of liver disease associated with the classical features of MS, the importance of insulin resistance as the common soil of different diseases. We still need to clarify the mechanism(s) responsible for liver disease progression from pure fatty liver, to steatohepatitis and to cirrhosis, and the reason(s) why only a few NAFLD cases progress to terminal liver failure while others (the majority) will have a cardiovascular outcome. The epidemics of obesity and diabetes of Western countries is expected to produce a significant increase of metabolic liver disease in the next years. Prevention and intervention programs based on lifestyle are therefore mandatory to reduce the burden of metabolic liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16778754

Citation

Marchesini, G, and M Babini. "Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Metabolic Syndrome." Minerva Cardioangiologica, vol. 54, no. 2, 2006, pp. 229-39.
Marchesini G, Babini M. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the metabolic syndrome. Minerva Cardioangiol. 2006;54(2):229-39.
Marchesini, G., & Babini, M. (2006). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the metabolic syndrome. Minerva Cardioangiologica, 54(2), 229-39.
Marchesini G, Babini M. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Metabolic Syndrome. Minerva Cardioangiol. 2006;54(2):229-39. PubMed PMID: 16778754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the metabolic syndrome. AU - Marchesini,G, AU - Babini,M, PY - 2006/6/17/pubmed PY - 2006/10/13/medline PY - 2006/6/17/entrez SP - 229 EP - 39 JF - Minerva cardioangiologica JO - Minerva Cardioangiol VL - 54 IS - 2 N2 - In the last 15 years evidence has been accumulating suggesting that hepatic steatosis may be the starting point for a progressive liver disease. Nonalcoholic steatosis (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD) is now considered a metabolic pathway to advanced liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver disease of other etiology, namely hepatitis C virus, may interact with NAFLD, although the underlying mechanism(s) have not been fully elucidated. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and dyslipidemia are the principal factors associated with NAFLD, which is now considered the hepatic expression of metabolic syndrome (MS). Several studies have dealt with the relationship of NAFLD and MS, the risk of liver disease associated with the classical features of MS, the importance of insulin resistance as the common soil of different diseases. We still need to clarify the mechanism(s) responsible for liver disease progression from pure fatty liver, to steatohepatitis and to cirrhosis, and the reason(s) why only a few NAFLD cases progress to terminal liver failure while others (the majority) will have a cardiovascular outcome. The epidemics of obesity and diabetes of Western countries is expected to produce a significant increase of metabolic liver disease in the next years. Prevention and intervention programs based on lifestyle are therefore mandatory to reduce the burden of metabolic liver disease. SN - 0026-4725 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16778754/Nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_and_the_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4280 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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