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Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides in rats.
Epilepsy Res. 2006 Aug; 70(2-3):244-56.ER

Abstract

A partially purified extract from American ginseng has been shown to have anticonvulsant activity. To identify the active components in this extract, the activities of the individual ginsenosides (Rb(1), Rb(3) and Rd), mixtures of the purified ginsenosides and a newly prepared Rb fraction were determined. One hour after treatment with vehicle or one of the ginseng products, seizures were induced in adult, Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg), pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 50mg/kg i.p. or 90 mg/kg s.c.). Time to seizure onset, duration of seizure activity and seizure severity were determined. Weight change and neuronal damage were assessed 24h after administration of KA or pilocarpine. Mixtures of purified Rb(1), Rb(3) with or without Rd had significant anticonvulsant effects in all three models of acutely induced seizures demonstrating that the ginsenosides are the active components in the Rb extract. The individual ginsenosides significantly increased the latency to onset of seizures after administration of kainic acid. Since no one individual ginsenoside accounted for the majority of the activity of the Rb extract, the results suggest that the most effective anticonvulsant product is a combination of ginsenosides. In addition, all of the ginseng products had significant neuroprotective activity beyond the reduction in seizure severity and duration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16782310

Citation

Lian, Xiao-Yuan, et al. "Anticonvulsant and Neuroprotective Effects of Ginsenosides in Rats." Epilepsy Research, vol. 70, no. 2-3, 2006, pp. 244-56.
Lian XY, Zhang Z, Stringer JL. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides in rats. Epilepsy Res. 2006;70(2-3):244-56.
Lian, X. Y., Zhang, Z., & Stringer, J. L. (2006). Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides in rats. Epilepsy Research, 70(2-3), 244-56.
Lian XY, Zhang Z, Stringer JL. Anticonvulsant and Neuroprotective Effects of Ginsenosides in Rats. Epilepsy Res. 2006;70(2-3):244-56. PubMed PMID: 16782310.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides in rats. AU - Lian,Xiao-Yuan, AU - Zhang,Zhizhen, AU - Stringer,Janet L, Y1 - 2006/06/16/ PY - 2006/02/06/received PY - 2006/05/09/revised PY - 2006/05/10/accepted PY - 2006/6/20/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/6/20/entrez SP - 244 EP - 56 JF - Epilepsy research JO - Epilepsy Res VL - 70 IS - 2-3 N2 - A partially purified extract from American ginseng has been shown to have anticonvulsant activity. To identify the active components in this extract, the activities of the individual ginsenosides (Rb(1), Rb(3) and Rd), mixtures of the purified ginsenosides and a newly prepared Rb fraction were determined. One hour after treatment with vehicle or one of the ginseng products, seizures were induced in adult, Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg), pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 50mg/kg i.p. or 90 mg/kg s.c.). Time to seizure onset, duration of seizure activity and seizure severity were determined. Weight change and neuronal damage were assessed 24h after administration of KA or pilocarpine. Mixtures of purified Rb(1), Rb(3) with or without Rd had significant anticonvulsant effects in all three models of acutely induced seizures demonstrating that the ginsenosides are the active components in the Rb extract. The individual ginsenosides significantly increased the latency to onset of seizures after administration of kainic acid. Since no one individual ginsenoside accounted for the majority of the activity of the Rb extract, the results suggest that the most effective anticonvulsant product is a combination of ginsenosides. In addition, all of the ginseng products had significant neuroprotective activity beyond the reduction in seizure severity and duration. SN - 0920-1211 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16782310/Anticonvulsant_and_neuroprotective_effects_of_ginsenosides_in_rats_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -