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Neoplastic effects of oral contraceptives.
Int J Fertil. 1991; 36 Suppl 1:19-24.IJ

Abstract

The potential association between the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) and certain types of cancer remains an important concern. Epidemiologic studies published over the past decade indicate that the overall risk of breast cancer is not increased among women exposed to OCs. Some studies have suggested an increased risk among younger women with long-term use, and this issue requires further study. OCs confer significant protection against endometrial and ovarian cancers, and the effect is duration-related: longer use is more protective. In the largest study to date, the protection against these two types of cancer persisted for at least 15 years after OCs were discontinued. Several studies have linked long-term OC use with an increased risk of cervical cancer or its precursors, but methodologic difficulties in studying cervical cancer are such that the potential association with OC use may never be clarified. A large international study has found no association between OC use for any duration and liver cancer. Neither malignant melanoma nor pituitary adenoma appears to be linked to OC use. In summary, OCs protect against endometrial and ovarian cancers and have no overall effect on the risk of breast cancer. Women using OCs should have regular Papanicolaou screening.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1678377

Citation

Grimes, D A.. "Neoplastic Effects of Oral Contraceptives." International Journal of Fertility, vol. 36 Suppl 1, 1991, pp. 19-24.
Grimes DA. Neoplastic effects of oral contraceptives. Int J Fertil. 1991;36 Suppl 1:19-24.
Grimes, D. A. (1991). Neoplastic effects of oral contraceptives. International Journal of Fertility, 36 Suppl 1, 19-24.
Grimes DA. Neoplastic Effects of Oral Contraceptives. Int J Fertil. 1991;36 Suppl 1:19-24. PubMed PMID: 1678377.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neoplastic effects of oral contraceptives. A1 - Grimes,D A, PY - 1991/1/1/pubmed PY - 1991/1/1/medline PY - 1991/1/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Biology KW - Breast Cancer--etiology KW - Cancer KW - Cervical Cancer KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Dermatitis KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Endocrine System KW - Endometrial Cancer KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Literature Review KW - Liver Neoplasms KW - Melanosis KW - Neoplasms KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Northern Europe KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Ovarian Cancer KW - Physiology KW - Pituitary Gland KW - United Kingdom KW - United States SP - 19 EP - 24 JF - International journal of fertility JO - Int J Fertil VL - 36 Suppl 1 N2 - The potential association between the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) and certain types of cancer remains an important concern. Epidemiologic studies published over the past decade indicate that the overall risk of breast cancer is not increased among women exposed to OCs. Some studies have suggested an increased risk among younger women with long-term use, and this issue requires further study. OCs confer significant protection against endometrial and ovarian cancers, and the effect is duration-related: longer use is more protective. In the largest study to date, the protection against these two types of cancer persisted for at least 15 years after OCs were discontinued. Several studies have linked long-term OC use with an increased risk of cervical cancer or its precursors, but methodologic difficulties in studying cervical cancer are such that the potential association with OC use may never be clarified. A large international study has found no association between OC use for any duration and liver cancer. Neither malignant melanoma nor pituitary adenoma appears to be linked to OC use. In summary, OCs protect against endometrial and ovarian cancers and have no overall effect on the risk of breast cancer. Women using OCs should have regular Papanicolaou screening. SN - 0020-725X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1678377/Neoplastic_effects_of_oral_contraceptives_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/breastcancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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