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Assessing social differences in overweight among 15- to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians from Oslo by register data and adolescent self-reported measures of socio-economic status.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jan; 31(1):30-8.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine to what extent self-reported and objective data on socio-economic status (SES) are associated with overweight/obesity among 15 to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional questionnaire study on health and health-related behaviors.

SUBJECTS

All school children aged 15-16 years old in 2000 and 2001 in Oslo, Norway. Response rate 88% (n=7343). This article is based on the data from the 5498 ethnic Norwegians.

MEASUREMENTS

Self-reported height and weight were used to measure overweight (including obesity) as defined by the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs at the nearest half-year intervals. SES was determined by register data from Statistics Norway on residential area, parental education and income and by adolescent self-reported measures on parental occupation and adolescents' educational plans.

RESULTS

The prevalence of overweight/obesity was low, but higher among boys (11%) than among girls (6%). Parental education (four levels) showed the clearest inverse gradients with overweight/obesity (boys: 18, 13, 10 and 7%; girls: 11, 6, 6 and 4%). Parental education remained significantly associated with overweight/obesity when adding occupation and income to the model for the boys, whereas there were no significant associations in the final model for the girls. Overweight/obesity was associated with a lower odds ratio of planning for higher education (college/university) among boys only.

CONCLUSION

For the boys, parental education was most strongly associated with overweight/obesity, and the association between overweight/obesity and educational plans appears to imply downward social mobility. The relationships between the various SES measures and overweight/obesity appeared more interrelated for the girls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. nanna.lien@medisin.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16788570

Citation

Lien, N, et al. "Assessing Social Differences in Overweight Among 15- to 16-year-old Ethnic Norwegians From Oslo By Register Data and Adolescent Self-reported Measures of Socio-economic Status." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 31, no. 1, 2007, pp. 30-8.
Lien N, Kumar BN, Holmboe-Ottesen G, et al. Assessing social differences in overweight among 15- to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians from Oslo by register data and adolescent self-reported measures of socio-economic status. Int J Obes (Lond). 2007;31(1):30-8.
Lien, N., Kumar, B. N., Holmboe-Ottesen, G., Klepp, K. I., & Wandel, M. (2007). Assessing social differences in overweight among 15- to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians from Oslo by register data and adolescent self-reported measures of socio-economic status. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 31(1), 30-8.
Lien N, et al. Assessing Social Differences in Overweight Among 15- to 16-year-old Ethnic Norwegians From Oslo By Register Data and Adolescent Self-reported Measures of Socio-economic Status. Int J Obes (Lond). 2007;31(1):30-8. PubMed PMID: 16788570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessing social differences in overweight among 15- to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians from Oslo by register data and adolescent self-reported measures of socio-economic status. AU - Lien,N, AU - Kumar,B N, AU - Holmboe-Ottesen,G, AU - Klepp,K-I, AU - Wandel,M, Y1 - 2006/06/20/ PY - 2006/6/22/pubmed PY - 2007/3/16/medline PY - 2006/6/22/entrez SP - 30 EP - 8 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine to what extent self-reported and objective data on socio-economic status (SES) are associated with overweight/obesity among 15 to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians. DESIGN: A cross-sectional questionnaire study on health and health-related behaviors. SUBJECTS: All school children aged 15-16 years old in 2000 and 2001 in Oslo, Norway. Response rate 88% (n=7343). This article is based on the data from the 5498 ethnic Norwegians. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported height and weight were used to measure overweight (including obesity) as defined by the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs at the nearest half-year intervals. SES was determined by register data from Statistics Norway on residential area, parental education and income and by adolescent self-reported measures on parental occupation and adolescents' educational plans. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight/obesity was low, but higher among boys (11%) than among girls (6%). Parental education (four levels) showed the clearest inverse gradients with overweight/obesity (boys: 18, 13, 10 and 7%; girls: 11, 6, 6 and 4%). Parental education remained significantly associated with overweight/obesity when adding occupation and income to the model for the boys, whereas there were no significant associations in the final model for the girls. Overweight/obesity was associated with a lower odds ratio of planning for higher education (college/university) among boys only. CONCLUSION: For the boys, parental education was most strongly associated with overweight/obesity, and the association between overweight/obesity and educational plans appears to imply downward social mobility. The relationships between the various SES measures and overweight/obesity appeared more interrelated for the girls. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16788570/Assessing_social_differences_in_overweight_among_15__to_16_year_old_ethnic_Norwegians_from_Oslo_by_register_data_and_adolescent_self_reported_measures_of_socio_economic_status_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -