Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV in children and adolescents after sexual assault: a prospective observational study in an urban medical center.
Sex Transm Dis 2007; 34(2):65-8ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We sought to evaluate the tolerability and feasibility of establishing an HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) program at our hospital using the guidelines for children and adolescents after sexual assault.

METHODS

This study was a prospective, nonrandomized observational study conducted from March 1999 until September 2002. Subjects (age <19 years) who presented to a pediatric emergency room within 72 hours of a sexual assault were eligible for enrollment. A 28-day PEP regimen of zidovudine and lamivudine was given.

RESULTS

In all, 70 adolescents were evaluated and 33 (31 females and 2 males) were enrolled. The mean age of enrolled subjects was 15 years, 61% were Hispanic, 30% black, and 79% presented to the emergency room within 24 hours of assault. Vaginal exposure was the most common site of penetration (64% [21 of 33]), but 18% (6 of 33) reported anal penetration. Only 9 subjects (27%) took >or=90% of all the medications. All subjects who returned for follow up tested HIV-negative. Adverse events occurred in 48% (16 of 33) of subjects; the most common events were abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting.

CONCLUSION

Poor adherence to medications and visits is a significant problem in PEP programs for sexually assaulted children and adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. nn45@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16794560

Citation

Neu, Natalie, et al. "Postexposure Prophylaxis for HIV in Children and Adolescents After Sexual Assault: a Prospective Observational Study in an Urban Medical Center." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 34, no. 2, 2007, pp. 65-8.
Neu N, Heffernan-Vacca S, Millery M, et al. Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV in children and adolescents after sexual assault: a prospective observational study in an urban medical center. Sex Transm Dis. 2007;34(2):65-8.
Neu, N., Heffernan-Vacca, S., Millery, M., Stimell, M., & Brown, J. (2007). Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV in children and adolescents after sexual assault: a prospective observational study in an urban medical center. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 34(2), pp. 65-8.
Neu N, et al. Postexposure Prophylaxis for HIV in Children and Adolescents After Sexual Assault: a Prospective Observational Study in an Urban Medical Center. Sex Transm Dis. 2007;34(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 16794560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postexposure prophylaxis for HIV in children and adolescents after sexual assault: a prospective observational study in an urban medical center. AU - Neu,Natalie, AU - Heffernan-Vacca,Susan, AU - Millery,Mari, AU - Stimell,Mindy, AU - Brown,Jocelyn, PY - 2006/6/24/pubmed PY - 2007/3/30/medline PY - 2006/6/24/entrez SP - 65 EP - 8 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: We sought to evaluate the tolerability and feasibility of establishing an HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) program at our hospital using the guidelines for children and adolescents after sexual assault. METHODS: This study was a prospective, nonrandomized observational study conducted from March 1999 until September 2002. Subjects (age <19 years) who presented to a pediatric emergency room within 72 hours of a sexual assault were eligible for enrollment. A 28-day PEP regimen of zidovudine and lamivudine was given. RESULTS: In all, 70 adolescents were evaluated and 33 (31 females and 2 males) were enrolled. The mean age of enrolled subjects was 15 years, 61% were Hispanic, 30% black, and 79% presented to the emergency room within 24 hours of assault. Vaginal exposure was the most common site of penetration (64% [21 of 33]), but 18% (6 of 33) reported anal penetration. Only 9 subjects (27%) took >or=90% of all the medications. All subjects who returned for follow up tested HIV-negative. Adverse events occurred in 48% (16 of 33) of subjects; the most common events were abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting. CONCLUSION: Poor adherence to medications and visits is a significant problem in PEP programs for sexually assaulted children and adolescents. SN - 0148-5717 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16794560/Postexposure_prophylaxis_for_HIV_in_children_and_adolescents_after_sexual_assault:_a_prospective_observational_study_in_an_urban_medical_center_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16794560 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -