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Diabetes and cognitive function in a population-based study of elderly women and men.
J Diabetes Complications 2006 Jul-Aug; 20(4):238-45JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to examine the association between diabetes and cognitive function in the elderly.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

From January to December 2003, all 740 participants, aged 70 years or more, of an ongoing population-based cohort study were eligible for a telephone interview on cognitive function. Cognitive function was assessed using validated instruments, including the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (TICS) and the East Boston Memory Test (EBMT). Information on diabetes was available from prior questionnaires and was validated in 2002. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) of an impaired cognitive function (below 25th percentile) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), physical exercise, educational level, and depressive symptoms.

RESULTS

Out of 473 participants interviewed (64.9%), 66 had diabetes (14.1%). The adjusted OR for diabetes and impaired cognitive function assessed by TICS was 2.3 (95% CI: 1.2-4.3). Diabetes was also associated with performance on delayed recall EBMT (adjusted OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.0-4.1), but not immediate EBMT recall (adjusted OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.5-2.1). The association between diabetes and cognitive function was a bit more pronounced in participants in whom diabetes was diagnosed 12 (median) or more years prior (adjusted OR with TICS=2.4; 95% CI: 1.0-5.8) and in those without antidiabetic treatment (age- and sex-adjusted OR=3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.5).

CONCLUSION

Diabetes should be considered to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in the elderly, which might be attenuated by antidiabetic treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Heidelberg, Germany. desiree.debling@psychologie.uni-heidelberg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16798475

Citation

Debling, Desiree, et al. "Diabetes and Cognitive Function in a Population-based Study of Elderly Women and Men." Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, vol. 20, no. 4, 2006, pp. 238-45.
Debling D, Amelang M, Hasselbach P, et al. Diabetes and cognitive function in a population-based study of elderly women and men. J Diabetes Complicat. 2006;20(4):238-45.
Debling, D., Amelang, M., Hasselbach, P., & Stürmer, T. (2006). Diabetes and cognitive function in a population-based study of elderly women and men. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 20(4), pp. 238-45.
Debling D, et al. Diabetes and Cognitive Function in a Population-based Study of Elderly Women and Men. J Diabetes Complicat. 2006;20(4):238-45. PubMed PMID: 16798475.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes and cognitive function in a population-based study of elderly women and men. AU - Debling,Desiree, AU - Amelang,Manfred, AU - Hasselbach,Petra, AU - Stürmer,Til, PY - 2005/02/02/received PY - 2005/03/29/revised PY - 2005/06/29/accepted PY - 2006/6/27/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/6/27/entrez SP - 238 EP - 45 JF - Journal of diabetes and its complications JO - J. Diabetes Complicat. VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the association between diabetes and cognitive function in the elderly. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: From January to December 2003, all 740 participants, aged 70 years or more, of an ongoing population-based cohort study were eligible for a telephone interview on cognitive function. Cognitive function was assessed using validated instruments, including the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (TICS) and the East Boston Memory Test (EBMT). Information on diabetes was available from prior questionnaires and was validated in 2002. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) of an impaired cognitive function (below 25th percentile) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), physical exercise, educational level, and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Out of 473 participants interviewed (64.9%), 66 had diabetes (14.1%). The adjusted OR for diabetes and impaired cognitive function assessed by TICS was 2.3 (95% CI: 1.2-4.3). Diabetes was also associated with performance on delayed recall EBMT (adjusted OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.0-4.1), but not immediate EBMT recall (adjusted OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.5-2.1). The association between diabetes and cognitive function was a bit more pronounced in participants in whom diabetes was diagnosed 12 (median) or more years prior (adjusted OR with TICS=2.4; 95% CI: 1.0-5.8) and in those without antidiabetic treatment (age- and sex-adjusted OR=3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.5). CONCLUSION: Diabetes should be considered to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in the elderly, which might be attenuated by antidiabetic treatment. SN - 1056-8727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16798475/Diabetes_and_cognitive_function_in_a_population_based_study_of_elderly_women_and_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1056-8727(05)00085-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -