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Relationship of underlying abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension with symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome.
Digestion. 2006; 73(2-3):133-41.D

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Abnormalities in rectal physiology play an important role in the genesis of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, their relationship to symptoms is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association of abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to specific symptoms in IBS.

METHODS

Fifty-six IBS patients and 14 healthy controls participated in this study. The intensities of individual IBS symptoms in the past 4 weeks were scored on a graded 5-point Likert scale. Using a barostat, isobaric rectal distensions were performed before and after a meal.

RESULTS

Rectal hypersensitivity and hypocompliance in the fasting state were observed in 68 and 52% of IBS patients, respectively. Postprandial hypersensitivity of the rectum was significantly more prevalent in the diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) group compared to the constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) group. The D-IBS group showed a significant postprandial decrease in rectal compliance, but the C-IBS group did not. A significant correlation was observed between a sense of incomplete evacuation and increased bowel movements with postprandial rectal hypersensitivity or hypocompliance.

CONCLUSION

A sense of incomplete evacuation and increased bowel movements are related to postprandial abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension. The other IBS symptoms do not seem to predict such abnormalities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea. kjleemd@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16804303

Citation

Lee, Kwang Jae, et al. "Relationship of Underlying Abnormalities in Rectal Sensitivity and Compliance to Distension With Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Digestion, vol. 73, no. 2-3, 2006, pp. 133-41.
Lee KJ, Kim JH, Cho SW. Relationship of underlying abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension with symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome. Digestion. 2006;73(2-3):133-41.
Lee, K. J., Kim, J. H., & Cho, S. W. (2006). Relationship of underlying abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension with symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome. Digestion, 73(2-3), 133-41.
Lee KJ, Kim JH, Cho SW. Relationship of Underlying Abnormalities in Rectal Sensitivity and Compliance to Distension With Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Digestion. 2006;73(2-3):133-41. PubMed PMID: 16804303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of underlying abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension with symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Lee,Kwang Jae, AU - Kim,Jin Hong, AU - Cho,Sung Won, Y1 - 2006/06/22/ PY - 2005/12/23/received PY - 2006/05/01/accepted PY - 2006/6/29/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/6/29/entrez SP - 133 EP - 41 JF - Digestion JO - Digestion VL - 73 IS - 2-3 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Abnormalities in rectal physiology play an important role in the genesis of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, their relationship to symptoms is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association of abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to specific symptoms in IBS. METHODS: Fifty-six IBS patients and 14 healthy controls participated in this study. The intensities of individual IBS symptoms in the past 4 weeks were scored on a graded 5-point Likert scale. Using a barostat, isobaric rectal distensions were performed before and after a meal. RESULTS: Rectal hypersensitivity and hypocompliance in the fasting state were observed in 68 and 52% of IBS patients, respectively. Postprandial hypersensitivity of the rectum was significantly more prevalent in the diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) group compared to the constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) group. The D-IBS group showed a significant postprandial decrease in rectal compliance, but the C-IBS group did not. A significant correlation was observed between a sense of incomplete evacuation and increased bowel movements with postprandial rectal hypersensitivity or hypocompliance. CONCLUSION: A sense of incomplete evacuation and increased bowel movements are related to postprandial abnormalities in rectal sensitivity and compliance to distension. The other IBS symptoms do not seem to predict such abnormalities. SN - 0012-2823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16804303/Relationship_of_underlying_abnormalities_in_rectal_sensitivity_and_compliance_to_distension_with_symptoms_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -