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Desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria secondary to increased nocturnal osmotic excretion.
J Urol. 2006 Aug; 176(2):749-53.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We investigated the role of increased solute excretion in children with desmopressin resistant nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 42 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and significant nocturnal polyuria with high nocturnal urinary osmolality (more than 850 mmol/l) were not responding to desmopressin. A 24-hour urinary concentration profile was obtained with measurement of urine volume, osmolality, osmotic excretion and creatinine. The control group consisted of 100 children without enuresis.

RESULTS

Based on osmotic excretion patients were classified into 3 groups. Group 1 had 24-hour increased osmotic excretion, most likely secondary to a high renal osmotic load. This was probably diet related since 11 of these 12 patients were obese. Group 2 had increased osmotic excretion in the evening and night, probably due to a high renal osmotic load caused by the diet characteristics of the evening meal. Group 3 had deficient osmotic excretion during the day, secondary to extremely low fluid intake to compensate for small bladder capacity.

CONCLUSIONS

Nocturnal polyuria with high urinary osmolality in our patients with desmopressin resistant monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis is related to abnormal increased osmotic excretion. This may be explained by their fluid and diet habits, eg daytime fluid restriction, and high protein and salt intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Nephrology and Pediatric Urology Department, University Hospital Ghent, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16813935

Citation

Dehoorne, Jo L., et al. "Desmopressin Resistant Nocturnal Polyuria Secondary to Increased Nocturnal Osmotic Excretion." The Journal of Urology, vol. 176, no. 2, 2006, pp. 749-53.
Dehoorne JL, Raes AM, van Laecke E, et al. Desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria secondary to increased nocturnal osmotic excretion. J Urol. 2006;176(2):749-53.
Dehoorne, J. L., Raes, A. M., van Laecke, E., Hoebeke, P., & Vande Walle, J. G. (2006). Desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria secondary to increased nocturnal osmotic excretion. The Journal of Urology, 176(2), 749-53.
Dehoorne JL, et al. Desmopressin Resistant Nocturnal Polyuria Secondary to Increased Nocturnal Osmotic Excretion. J Urol. 2006;176(2):749-53. PubMed PMID: 16813935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria secondary to increased nocturnal osmotic excretion. AU - Dehoorne,Jo L, AU - Raes,Ann M, AU - van Laecke,Erik, AU - Hoebeke,Piet, AU - Vande Walle,Johan G, PY - 2005/09/09/received PY - 2006/7/4/pubmed PY - 2006/8/30/medline PY - 2006/7/4/entrez SP - 749 EP - 53 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 176 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: We investigated the role of increased solute excretion in children with desmopressin resistant nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 42 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and significant nocturnal polyuria with high nocturnal urinary osmolality (more than 850 mmol/l) were not responding to desmopressin. A 24-hour urinary concentration profile was obtained with measurement of urine volume, osmolality, osmotic excretion and creatinine. The control group consisted of 100 children without enuresis. RESULTS: Based on osmotic excretion patients were classified into 3 groups. Group 1 had 24-hour increased osmotic excretion, most likely secondary to a high renal osmotic load. This was probably diet related since 11 of these 12 patients were obese. Group 2 had increased osmotic excretion in the evening and night, probably due to a high renal osmotic load caused by the diet characteristics of the evening meal. Group 3 had deficient osmotic excretion during the day, secondary to extremely low fluid intake to compensate for small bladder capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Nocturnal polyuria with high urinary osmolality in our patients with desmopressin resistant monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis is related to abnormal increased osmotic excretion. This may be explained by their fluid and diet habits, eg daytime fluid restriction, and high protein and salt intake. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16813935/Desmopressin_resistant_nocturnal_polyuria_secondary_to_increased_nocturnal_osmotic_excretion_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/10.1016/S0022-5347(06)00297-7?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -