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Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2006 Jul; 142(1):105-11.AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the association of APOE polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy.

DESIGN

Population-based cross-sectional study.

METHODS

We studied 1,398 people aged 49 to 73 years with diabetes selected from four United States communities. We performed retinal photography on one randomly selected eye and graded for the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy using a modification of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. We performed genotyping of common polymorphic APOE alleles using polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA from venous blood leukocytes.

RESULTS

The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and hard exudates was 15.0% and 5.3% in Caucasians (n = 935), and 24.6% and 9.7% in African-Americans (n = 463), with type 2 diabetes. APOE gene polymorphisms were not associated with diabetic retinopathy in either Caucasians or African-Americans. In African-Americans, the 2/4 genotype (n = 6) was associated with increased prevalence of hard exudates (odds ratio [OR] 4.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30 to 12.90), as was the 2/3 genotype (n = 9, OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.95). No association between APOE genotypes and hard exudates was found in Caucasians.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that APOE gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy in either Caucasians or African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Vision Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16815257

Citation

Liew, Gerald, et al. "Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphisms Are Not Associated With Diabetic Retinopathy: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study." American Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 142, no. 1, 2006, pp. 105-11.
Liew G, Shankar A, Wang JJ, et al. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2006;142(1):105-11.
Liew, G., Shankar, A., Wang, J. J., Klein, R., Bray, M. S., Couper, D. J., & Wong, T. Y. (2006). Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. American Journal of Ophthalmology, 142(1), 105-11.
Liew G, et al. Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphisms Are Not Associated With Diabetic Retinopathy: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Am J Ophthalmol. 2006;142(1):105-11. PubMed PMID: 16815257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. AU - Liew,Gerald, AU - Shankar,Anoop, AU - Wang,Jie Jin, AU - Klein,Ronald, AU - Bray,Molly S, AU - Couper,David J, AU - Wong,Tien Y, PY - 2005/11/29/received PY - 2006/02/08/revised PY - 2006/02/11/accepted PY - 2006/7/4/pubmed PY - 2006/7/28/medline PY - 2006/7/4/entrez SP - 105 EP - 11 JF - American journal of ophthalmology JO - Am J Ophthalmol VL - 142 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the association of APOE polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We studied 1,398 people aged 49 to 73 years with diabetes selected from four United States communities. We performed retinal photography on one randomly selected eye and graded for the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy using a modification of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. We performed genotyping of common polymorphic APOE alleles using polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA from venous blood leukocytes. RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and hard exudates was 15.0% and 5.3% in Caucasians (n = 935), and 24.6% and 9.7% in African-Americans (n = 463), with type 2 diabetes. APOE gene polymorphisms were not associated with diabetic retinopathy in either Caucasians or African-Americans. In African-Americans, the 2/4 genotype (n = 6) was associated with increased prevalence of hard exudates (odds ratio [OR] 4.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30 to 12.90), as was the 2/3 genotype (n = 9, OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.95). No association between APOE genotypes and hard exudates was found in Caucasians. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that APOE gene polymorphisms are not associated with diabetic retinopathy in either Caucasians or African-Americans with type 2 diabetes. SN - 0002-9394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16815257/Apolipoprotein_E_gene_polymorphisms_are_not_associated_with_diabetic_retinopathy:_the_atherosclerosis_risk_in_communities_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9394(06)00349-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -