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Heavy use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture: a growing problem for human and animal health and for the environment.

Abstract

The accelerated growth of finfish aquaculture has resulted in a series of developments detrimental to the environment and human health. The latter is illustrated by the widespread and unrestricted use of prophylactic antibiotics in this industry, especially in developing countries, to forestall bacterial infections resulting from sanitary shortcomings in fish rearing. The use of a wide variety of antibiotics in large amounts, including non-biodegradable antibiotics useful in human medicine, ensures that they remain in the aquatic environment, exerting their selective pressure for long periods of time. This process has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in aquaculture environments, in the increase of antibiotic resistance in fish pathogens, in the transfer of these resistance determinants to bacteria of land animals and to human pathogens, and in alterations of the bacterial flora both in sediments and in the water column. The use of large amounts of antibiotics that have to be mixed with fish food also creates problems for industrial health and increases the opportunities for the presence of residual antibiotics in fish meat and fish products. Thus, it appears that global efforts are needed to promote more judicious use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture as accumulating evidence indicates that unrestricted use is detrimental to fish, terrestrial animals, and human health and the environment.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA. cabello@nymc.edu

    Source

    Environmental microbiology 8:7 2006 Jul pg 1137-44

    MeSH

    Animals
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Antibiotic Prophylaxis
    Aquaculture
    Bacteria
    Drug Residues
    Drug Resistance, Bacterial
    Environmental Microbiology
    Fishes
    Food Hypersensitivity
    Humans
    Water Microbiology

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16817922

    Citation

    Cabello, Felipe C.. "Heavy Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Aquaculture: a Growing Problem for Human and Animal Health and for the Environment." Environmental Microbiology, vol. 8, no. 7, 2006, pp. 1137-44.
    Cabello FC. Heavy use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture: a growing problem for human and animal health and for the environment. Environ Microbiol. 2006;8(7):1137-44.
    Cabello, F. C. (2006). Heavy use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture: a growing problem for human and animal health and for the environment. Environmental Microbiology, 8(7), pp. 1137-44.
    Cabello FC. Heavy Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Aquaculture: a Growing Problem for Human and Animal Health and for the Environment. Environ Microbiol. 2006;8(7):1137-44. PubMed PMID: 16817922.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture: a growing problem for human and animal health and for the environment. A1 - Cabello,Felipe C, PY - 2006/7/5/pubmed PY - 2006/8/9/medline PY - 2006/7/5/entrez SP - 1137 EP - 44 JF - Environmental microbiology JO - Environ. Microbiol. VL - 8 IS - 7 N2 - The accelerated growth of finfish aquaculture has resulted in a series of developments detrimental to the environment and human health. The latter is illustrated by the widespread and unrestricted use of prophylactic antibiotics in this industry, especially in developing countries, to forestall bacterial infections resulting from sanitary shortcomings in fish rearing. The use of a wide variety of antibiotics in large amounts, including non-biodegradable antibiotics useful in human medicine, ensures that they remain in the aquatic environment, exerting their selective pressure for long periods of time. This process has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in aquaculture environments, in the increase of antibiotic resistance in fish pathogens, in the transfer of these resistance determinants to bacteria of land animals and to human pathogens, and in alterations of the bacterial flora both in sediments and in the water column. The use of large amounts of antibiotics that have to be mixed with fish food also creates problems for industrial health and increases the opportunities for the presence of residual antibiotics in fish meat and fish products. Thus, it appears that global efforts are needed to promote more judicious use of prophylactic antibiotics in aquaculture as accumulating evidence indicates that unrestricted use is detrimental to fish, terrestrial animals, and human health and the environment. SN - 1462-2912 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16817922/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2006.01054.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -