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Use of human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis in adolescent sexual assault victims.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2006; 160(7):674-80AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe the use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) in adolescent survivors of sexual assault and to explore barriers to PEP completion in this population.

DESIGN

Chart review.

SETTING

Two academic medical centers in Boston, Mass, between July 1, 2001, and June 30, 2003.

PARTICIPANTS

Adolescents presenting to 2 urban pediatric emergency departments within 72 hours of a penetrating sexual assault. Of 177 charts reviewed, adequate documentation of the sexual assault and medical management was available for 145 patients.

INTERVENTION

Provision of HIV PEP.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Documented completion of a 28-day course of PEP.

RESULTS

Among the 145 patients, 96% were female, 38% were black, and 14% were Hispanic. Many patients were uncertain regarding their exposures: 27% were unsure whether a condom had been used, 54% were unsure whether ejaculation had occurred, and 21% had blacked out during the assault. One hundred ten (76%) received HIV PEP. Of the 97 patients referred for follow-up at the academic centers, 37 returned for at least 1 visit and 13 completed a 28-day course of PEP. Sixteen (46%) of those taking PEP who returned for follow-up developed an adverse reaction to medication. Forty-seven percent of adolescent sexual assault survivors had carried a psychiatric diagnosis before the assault; adherence to PEP was lower among these adolescents.

CONCLUSIONS

We observed low rates of PEP completion among adolescent sexual assault survivors. Potential difficulties of using PEP in this population include uncertainties regarding exposure, high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, and low rates of return for follow-up care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adolescent Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass, USA. Eo85@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16818831

Citation

Olshen, Elyse, et al. "Use of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis in Adolescent Sexual Assault Victims." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 160, no. 7, 2006, pp. 674-80.
Olshen E, Hsu K, Woods ER, et al. Use of human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis in adolescent sexual assault victims. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(7):674-80.
Olshen, E., Hsu, K., Woods, E. R., Harper, M., Harnisch, B., & Samples, C. L. (2006). Use of human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis in adolescent sexual assault victims. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 160(7), pp. 674-80.
Olshen E, et al. Use of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis in Adolescent Sexual Assault Victims. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(7):674-80. PubMed PMID: 16818831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis in adolescent sexual assault victims. AU - Olshen,Elyse, AU - Hsu,Katherine, AU - Woods,Elizabeth R, AU - Harper,Marvin, AU - Harnisch,Brooke, AU - Samples,Cathryn L, PY - 2006/7/5/pubmed PY - 2006/8/9/medline PY - 2006/7/5/entrez SP - 674 EP - 80 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 160 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) in adolescent survivors of sexual assault and to explore barriers to PEP completion in this population. DESIGN: Chart review. SETTING: Two academic medical centers in Boston, Mass, between July 1, 2001, and June 30, 2003. PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents presenting to 2 urban pediatric emergency departments within 72 hours of a penetrating sexual assault. Of 177 charts reviewed, adequate documentation of the sexual assault and medical management was available for 145 patients. INTERVENTION: Provision of HIV PEP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Documented completion of a 28-day course of PEP. RESULTS: Among the 145 patients, 96% were female, 38% were black, and 14% were Hispanic. Many patients were uncertain regarding their exposures: 27% were unsure whether a condom had been used, 54% were unsure whether ejaculation had occurred, and 21% had blacked out during the assault. One hundred ten (76%) received HIV PEP. Of the 97 patients referred for follow-up at the academic centers, 37 returned for at least 1 visit and 13 completed a 28-day course of PEP. Sixteen (46%) of those taking PEP who returned for follow-up developed an adverse reaction to medication. Forty-seven percent of adolescent sexual assault survivors had carried a psychiatric diagnosis before the assault; adherence to PEP was lower among these adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: We observed low rates of PEP completion among adolescent sexual assault survivors. Potential difficulties of using PEP in this population include uncertainties regarding exposure, high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, and low rates of return for follow-up care. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16818831/Use_of_human_immunodeficiency_virus_postexposure_prophylaxis_in_adolescent_sexual_assault_victims_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.160.7.674 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -