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Type 2 diabetes does not increase risk of depression.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although diabetes mellitus has a strong association with the presence of depression, it is unclear whether diabetes itself increases the risk of developing depression. The objective of our study was to evaluate whether people with diabetes have a greater incidence of depression than those without diabetes.

METHODS

We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the administrative databases of Saskatchewan Health from 1989 to 2001. People older than 20 years with newly identified type 2 diabetes were identified by means of diagnostic codes and prescription records and compared with a nondiabetic cohort. Depression was ascertained via diagnostic codes and prescriptions for antidepressants. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after adjusting for age, sex, frequency of visits to physicians and presence of comorbidities.

RESULTS

We identified 31 635 people with diabetes and 57 141 without. Those with diabetes were older (61.4 v. 46.8 yr; p < 0.001), were more likely to be male (55.4% v. 49.8%; p < 0.001) and had more physician visits during the year after their index date (mean 14.5 v. 5.9; p < 0.001). The incidence of new-onset depression was similar in both groups (6.5 v. 6.6 per 1000 person-years among people with and without diabetes, respectively). Similarity of risk persisted after controlling for age, sex, number of physician visits and presence of prespecified comorbidities (adjusted HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.94- 1.15). Other chronic conditions such as arthritis (HR 1.18) and stroke (HR 1.73) were associated with the onset of depression.

INTERPRETATION

Using a large, population-based administrative cohort, we found little evidence that type 2 diabetes increases the risk of depression once comorbid diseases and the burden of diabetes complications were accounted for.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cohort Studies
    Comorbidity
    Depression
    Diabetes Complications
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Retrospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Saskatchewan

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16818907

    Citation

    Brown, Lauren C., et al. "Type 2 Diabetes Does Not Increase Risk of Depression." CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal = Journal De l'Association Medicale Canadienne, vol. 175, no. 1, 2006, pp. 42-6.
    Brown LC, Majumdar SR, Newman SC, et al. Type 2 diabetes does not increase risk of depression. CMAJ. 2006;175(1):42-6.
    Brown, L. C., Majumdar, S. R., Newman, S. C., & Johnson, J. A. (2006). Type 2 diabetes does not increase risk of depression. CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal = Journal De l'Association Medicale Canadienne, 175(1), pp. 42-6.
    Brown LC, et al. Type 2 Diabetes Does Not Increase Risk of Depression. CMAJ. 2006 Jul 4;175(1):42-6. PubMed PMID: 16818907.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Type 2 diabetes does not increase risk of depression. AU - Brown,Lauren C, AU - Majumdar,Sumit R, AU - Newman,Stephen C, AU - Johnson,Jeffrey A, PY - 2006/7/5/pubmed PY - 2006/7/14/medline PY - 2006/7/5/entrez SP - 42 EP - 6 JF - CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne JO - CMAJ VL - 175 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although diabetes mellitus has a strong association with the presence of depression, it is unclear whether diabetes itself increases the risk of developing depression. The objective of our study was to evaluate whether people with diabetes have a greater incidence of depression than those without diabetes. METHODS: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the administrative databases of Saskatchewan Health from 1989 to 2001. People older than 20 years with newly identified type 2 diabetes were identified by means of diagnostic codes and prescription records and compared with a nondiabetic cohort. Depression was ascertained via diagnostic codes and prescriptions for antidepressants. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after adjusting for age, sex, frequency of visits to physicians and presence of comorbidities. RESULTS: We identified 31 635 people with diabetes and 57 141 without. Those with diabetes were older (61.4 v. 46.8 yr; p < 0.001), were more likely to be male (55.4% v. 49.8%; p < 0.001) and had more physician visits during the year after their index date (mean 14.5 v. 5.9; p < 0.001). The incidence of new-onset depression was similar in both groups (6.5 v. 6.6 per 1000 person-years among people with and without diabetes, respectively). Similarity of risk persisted after controlling for age, sex, number of physician visits and presence of prespecified comorbidities (adjusted HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.94- 1.15). Other chronic conditions such as arthritis (HR 1.18) and stroke (HR 1.73) were associated with the onset of depression. INTERPRETATION: Using a large, population-based administrative cohort, we found little evidence that type 2 diabetes increases the risk of depression once comorbid diseases and the burden of diabetes complications were accounted for. SN - 1488-2329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16818907/Type_2_diabetes_does_not_increase_risk_of_depression_ L2 - http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16818907 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -