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The management of conditioned nutritional requirements in heart failure.
Heart Fail Rev. 2006 Mar; 11(1):75-82.HF

Abstract

Patients suffering from congestive heart failure exhibit impaired myocardial energy production, myocyte calcium overload and increased oxidative stress. Nutritional factors known to be important for myocardial energy production, calcium homeostasis and the reduction of oxidative stress, such as thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, creatine and taurine are reduced in this patient population. Furthermore, deficiencies of taurine, carnitine, and thiamine are established primary causes of dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies in animals and limited trials in humans have shown that dietary replacement of some of these compounds in heart failure can significantly restore depleted levels and may result in improvement in myocardial structure and function as well as exercise capacity. Larger scale studies examining micronutrient depletion in heart failure patients, and the benefits of dietary replacement need to be performed. At the present time, it is our belief that these conditioned nutritional requirements, if unsatisfied, contribute to myocyte dysfunction and loss; thus, restoration of nutritional deficiencies should be part of the overall therapeutic strategy for patients with congestive heart failure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16819580

Citation

Allard, Marc L., et al. "The Management of Conditioned Nutritional Requirements in Heart Failure." Heart Failure Reviews, vol. 11, no. 1, 2006, pp. 75-82.
Allard ML, Jeejeebhoy KN, Sole MJ. The management of conditioned nutritional requirements in heart failure. Heart Fail Rev. 2006;11(1):75-82.
Allard, M. L., Jeejeebhoy, K. N., & Sole, M. J. (2006). The management of conditioned nutritional requirements in heart failure. Heart Failure Reviews, 11(1), 75-82.
Allard ML, Jeejeebhoy KN, Sole MJ. The Management of Conditioned Nutritional Requirements in Heart Failure. Heart Fail Rev. 2006;11(1):75-82. PubMed PMID: 16819580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The management of conditioned nutritional requirements in heart failure. AU - Allard,Marc L, AU - Jeejeebhoy,Khursheed N, AU - Sole,Michael J, PY - 2006/7/5/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/7/5/entrez SP - 75 EP - 82 JF - Heart failure reviews JO - Heart Fail Rev VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - Patients suffering from congestive heart failure exhibit impaired myocardial energy production, myocyte calcium overload and increased oxidative stress. Nutritional factors known to be important for myocardial energy production, calcium homeostasis and the reduction of oxidative stress, such as thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, creatine and taurine are reduced in this patient population. Furthermore, deficiencies of taurine, carnitine, and thiamine are established primary causes of dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies in animals and limited trials in humans have shown that dietary replacement of some of these compounds in heart failure can significantly restore depleted levels and may result in improvement in myocardial structure and function as well as exercise capacity. Larger scale studies examining micronutrient depletion in heart failure patients, and the benefits of dietary replacement need to be performed. At the present time, it is our belief that these conditioned nutritional requirements, if unsatisfied, contribute to myocyte dysfunction and loss; thus, restoration of nutritional deficiencies should be part of the overall therapeutic strategy for patients with congestive heart failure. SN - 1382-4147 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16819580/The_management_of_conditioned_nutritional_requirements_in_heart_failure_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10741-006-9195-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -