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Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout.
Arthritis Res Ther 2006; 8 Suppl 1:S2AR

Abstract

Gout affects more than 1% of adults in the USA, and it is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis among men. Accumulating data support an increase in the prevalence of gout that is potentially attributable to recent shifts in diet and lifestyle, improved medical care, and increased longevity. There are both nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors for hyperuricemia and gout. Nonmodifiable risk factors include age and sex. Gout prevalence increases in direct association with age; the increased longevity of populations in industrialized nations may contribute to a higher prevalence of gout through the disorder's association with aging-related diseases such as metabolic syndrome and hypertension, and treatments for these diseases such as thiazide diuretics for hypertension. Although gout is considered to be primarily a male disease, there is a more equal sex distribution among elderly patients. Modifiable risk factors for gout include obesity, the use of certain medications, high purine intake, and consumption of purine-rich alcoholic beverages. The increasing prevalence of gout worldwide indicates that there is an urgent need for improved efforts to identify patients with hyperuricemia early in the disease process, before the clinical manifestations of gout become apparent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UAB Center for Education and Research (CERTs) on Therapeutics of Musculoskeletal Disorders, Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. ksaag@uab.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16820041

Citation

Saag, Kenneth G., and Hyon Choi. "Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Lifestyle Modifications for Gout." Arthritis Research & Therapy, vol. 8 Suppl 1, 2006, pp. S2.
Saag KG, Choi H. Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout. Arthritis Res Ther. 2006;8 Suppl 1:S2.
Saag, K. G., & Choi, H. (2006). Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 8 Suppl 1, pp. S2.
Saag KG, Choi H. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Lifestyle Modifications for Gout. Arthritis Res Ther. 2006;8 Suppl 1:S2. PubMed PMID: 16820041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout. AU - Saag,Kenneth G, AU - Choi,Hyon, Y1 - 2006/04/12/ PY - 2006/7/6/pubmed PY - 2006/8/1/medline PY - 2006/7/6/entrez SP - S2 EP - S2 JF - Arthritis research & therapy JO - Arthritis Res. Ther. VL - 8 Suppl 1 N2 - Gout affects more than 1% of adults in the USA, and it is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis among men. Accumulating data support an increase in the prevalence of gout that is potentially attributable to recent shifts in diet and lifestyle, improved medical care, and increased longevity. There are both nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors for hyperuricemia and gout. Nonmodifiable risk factors include age and sex. Gout prevalence increases in direct association with age; the increased longevity of populations in industrialized nations may contribute to a higher prevalence of gout through the disorder's association with aging-related diseases such as metabolic syndrome and hypertension, and treatments for these diseases such as thiazide diuretics for hypertension. Although gout is considered to be primarily a male disease, there is a more equal sex distribution among elderly patients. Modifiable risk factors for gout include obesity, the use of certain medications, high purine intake, and consumption of purine-rich alcoholic beverages. The increasing prevalence of gout worldwide indicates that there is an urgent need for improved efforts to identify patients with hyperuricemia early in the disease process, before the clinical manifestations of gout become apparent. SN - 1478-6362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16820041/Epidemiology_risk_factors_and_lifestyle_modifications_for_gout_ L2 - https://arthritis-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/ar1907 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -