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HIV postexposure prophylaxis: Who should get it?
J Fam Pract. 2006 Jul; 55(7):600-4.JF

Abstract

In most cases, HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is given only to healthcare workers if the settings make exposure to HIV-infected persons likely. Otherwise, it is usually deemed unnecessary. However, a decision for or against PEP is complicated. Occupational and nonoccupational exposure to HIV can produce fear, anxiety, and stress. Information on the exposure risk is frequently incomplete, the risk of infection is usually low, the degree of protection offered by PEP is not fully defined, and the potential for side effects from the medications is significant. This article distills the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's most recent guidance on HIV PEP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 4001 North Third Street #415, Phoenix, AZ 85012, USA. dougco@u.arizona.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16822447

Citation

Campos-Outcalt, Doug. "HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis: Who Should Get It?" The Journal of Family Practice, vol. 55, no. 7, 2006, pp. 600-4.
Campos-Outcalt D. HIV postexposure prophylaxis: Who should get it? J Fam Pract. 2006;55(7):600-4.
Campos-Outcalt, D. (2006). HIV postexposure prophylaxis: Who should get it? The Journal of Family Practice, 55(7), 600-4.
Campos-Outcalt D. HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis: Who Should Get It. J Fam Pract. 2006;55(7):600-4. PubMed PMID: 16822447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV postexposure prophylaxis: Who should get it? A1 - Campos-Outcalt,Doug, PY - 2006/7/11/pubmed PY - 2006/8/3/medline PY - 2006/7/11/entrez SP - 600 EP - 4 JF - The Journal of family practice JO - J Fam Pract VL - 55 IS - 7 N2 - In most cases, HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is given only to healthcare workers if the settings make exposure to HIV-infected persons likely. Otherwise, it is usually deemed unnecessary. However, a decision for or against PEP is complicated. Occupational and nonoccupational exposure to HIV can produce fear, anxiety, and stress. Information on the exposure risk is frequently incomplete, the risk of infection is usually low, the degree of protection offered by PEP is not fully defined, and the potential for side effects from the medications is significant. This article distills the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's most recent guidance on HIV PEP. SN - 0094-3509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16822447/HIV_postexposure_prophylaxis:_Who_should_get_it L2 - http://www.jfponline.com/Pages.asp?AID=4250 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -