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Adverse events among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Nov; 15(11):763-74.PD

Abstract

PURPOSE

The objective of this study was to quantify rates of adverse events in a high-risk multi-morbid population of institutionalized patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective cohort study among nursing home residents diagnosed with AD and psychosis during January 1998 to October 1999. Using the Medicare Minimum Data Set (MDS) and Medicare inpatient claims (ICD-9 codes), 7728 nursing home residents aged 55-95 years with AD and psychosis were identified for study. Potential adverse events of interest were identified from the MDS and Medicare inpatient claims (ICD-9 codes). We estimated the incidence rate (IR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each adverse event during a 2-year follow-up period.

RESULTS

Of the 7728 residents studied, nearly 30% were considered 'dependent' by the activities of daily living (ADL) score and approximately 15% exhibited severe cognitive impairment at baseline. At least 90% had comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most common adverse event was accidental injury, occurring at a rate of 97.7 per 100 person-years (95%CI = 94.7-100.7). Other common adverse events were death (IR = 44.6/100 person-years; 95%CI = 42.9-46.4), infection (IR = 41.8/100 person-years; 95%CI = 39.7-43.8), pain (IR = 43.5/100 person-years; 95%CI = 41.2-45.9), anorexia (41.3/100 person-years; 95%CI = 39.1-43.6), and weight change (IR = 40.2/100 person-years; 95%CI = 38.7-41.7).

CONCLUSIONS

This information on the occurrence of adverse outcomes among nursing home patients with AD and psychosis provides useful context for any safety event observed among patients treated for psychosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Episource, Hamden, CT, USA. oliveri1@mskcc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16823890

Citation

Oliveria, Susan A., et al. "Adverse Events Among Nursing Home Residents With Alzheimer's Disease and Psychosis." Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, vol. 15, no. 11, 2006, pp. 763-74.
Oliveria SA, Liperoti R, L'italien G, et al. Adverse events among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006;15(11):763-74.
Oliveria, S. A., Liperoti, R., L'italien, G., Pugner, K., Safferman, A., Carson, W., & Lapane, K. (2006). Adverse events among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 15(11), 763-74.
Oliveria SA, et al. Adverse Events Among Nursing Home Residents With Alzheimer's Disease and Psychosis. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006;15(11):763-74. PubMed PMID: 16823890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse events among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis. AU - Oliveria,Susan A, AU - Liperoti,Rosa, AU - L'italien,Gilbert, AU - Pugner,Klaus, AU - Safferman,Allan, AU - Carson,William, AU - Lapane,Kate, PY - 2006/7/11/pubmed PY - 2007/1/20/medline PY - 2006/7/11/entrez SP - 763 EP - 74 JF - Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety JO - Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf VL - 15 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to quantify rates of adverse events in a high-risk multi-morbid population of institutionalized patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among nursing home residents diagnosed with AD and psychosis during January 1998 to October 1999. Using the Medicare Minimum Data Set (MDS) and Medicare inpatient claims (ICD-9 codes), 7728 nursing home residents aged 55-95 years with AD and psychosis were identified for study. Potential adverse events of interest were identified from the MDS and Medicare inpatient claims (ICD-9 codes). We estimated the incidence rate (IR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each adverse event during a 2-year follow-up period. RESULTS: Of the 7728 residents studied, nearly 30% were considered 'dependent' by the activities of daily living (ADL) score and approximately 15% exhibited severe cognitive impairment at baseline. At least 90% had comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most common adverse event was accidental injury, occurring at a rate of 97.7 per 100 person-years (95%CI = 94.7-100.7). Other common adverse events were death (IR = 44.6/100 person-years; 95%CI = 42.9-46.4), infection (IR = 41.8/100 person-years; 95%CI = 39.7-43.8), pain (IR = 43.5/100 person-years; 95%CI = 41.2-45.9), anorexia (41.3/100 person-years; 95%CI = 39.1-43.6), and weight change (IR = 40.2/100 person-years; 95%CI = 38.7-41.7). CONCLUSIONS: This information on the occurrence of adverse outcomes among nursing home patients with AD and psychosis provides useful context for any safety event observed among patients treated for psychosis. SN - 1053-8569 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16823890/Adverse_events_among_nursing_home_residents_with_Alzheimer's_disease_and_psychosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.1274 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -