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Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: implications of host genetics.
FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2006 Jul; 47(2):155-66.FI

Abstract

Little is known of the role of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles or non-HLA alleles in determining resistance, susceptibility or the severity of acute viral infections. Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are suitable models for immunogenetic studies, yet only superficial efforts have been made to study dengue disease to date. DF and DHF can be caused by both primary and secondary infection by any of the four serotypes of the dengue virus. Differences in host susceptibility to infectious disease and disease severity cannot be attributed solely to the virus virulence. Variations in immune response, often associated with polymorphism in the human genome, can now be detected. Data on the influence of human genes in DF and DHF are discussed here in relation to (1) associations between HLA polymorphism and dengue disease susceptibility or resistance, (2) protective alleles influencing progression to severe disease, (3) alleles restricting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and (4) non-HLA genetic factors that may contribute to DHF evolution. Recent discoveries regarding genetic associations in other viral infections may provide clues to understanding the development of end-stage complications in dengue disease. The scanty positive data presented here indicate a need for detailed genetic studies in different ethnic groups in different countries during the acute phase of DF and DHF on a larger number of patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, K.G. Medical University, Lucknow, India. ucc05@rediffmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16831202

Citation

Chaturvedi, Umeshc, et al. "Dengue and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: Implications of Host Genetics." FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, vol. 47, no. 2, 2006, pp. 155-66.
Chaturvedi U, Nagar R, Shrivastava R. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: implications of host genetics. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2006;47(2):155-66.
Chaturvedi, U., Nagar, R., & Shrivastava, R. (2006). Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: implications of host genetics. FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, 47(2), 155-66.
Chaturvedi U, Nagar R, Shrivastava R. Dengue and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: Implications of Host Genetics. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2006;47(2):155-66. PubMed PMID: 16831202.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: implications of host genetics. AU - Chaturvedi,Umeshc, AU - Nagar,Rachna, AU - Shrivastava,Richa, PY - 2006/7/13/pubmed PY - 2006/9/6/medline PY - 2006/7/13/entrez SP - 155 EP - 66 JF - FEMS immunology and medical microbiology JO - FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - Little is known of the role of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles or non-HLA alleles in determining resistance, susceptibility or the severity of acute viral infections. Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are suitable models for immunogenetic studies, yet only superficial efforts have been made to study dengue disease to date. DF and DHF can be caused by both primary and secondary infection by any of the four serotypes of the dengue virus. Differences in host susceptibility to infectious disease and disease severity cannot be attributed solely to the virus virulence. Variations in immune response, often associated with polymorphism in the human genome, can now be detected. Data on the influence of human genes in DF and DHF are discussed here in relation to (1) associations between HLA polymorphism and dengue disease susceptibility or resistance, (2) protective alleles influencing progression to severe disease, (3) alleles restricting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and (4) non-HLA genetic factors that may contribute to DHF evolution. Recent discoveries regarding genetic associations in other viral infections may provide clues to understanding the development of end-stage complications in dengue disease. The scanty positive data presented here indicate a need for detailed genetic studies in different ethnic groups in different countries during the acute phase of DF and DHF on a larger number of patients. SN - 0928-8244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16831202/Dengue_and_dengue_haemorrhagic_fever:_implications_of_host_genetics_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0928-8244&date=2006&volume=47&issue=2&spage=155 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -