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Sertraline to treat hot flashes: a randomized controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in a general population.
Menopause. 2006 Jul-Aug; 13(4):568-75.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effectiveness of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (sertraline) in decreasing hot flashes in a general population of women.

DESIGN

A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted in a southwestern urban setting. A total of 102 women aged 40 to 65 who were experiencing hot flashes and not taking any hormone therapy were recruited. After 1 week of baseline hot flash data collection, study participants were randomized to receive placebo or active drug (sertraline 50 mg) for 4 weeks. This intervention was followed by a 1-week washout and cross over to the opposite treatment for 4 weeks. The number and severity of hot flashes were measured.

RESULTS

One hundred two women were enrolled in the study. Five dropped out before providing baseline data. Of the 97 remaining, 52 were randomized to active drug first and 45 to placebo first. Ten dropped out of the study before completing all 10 weeks, leaving 46 in the active drug-first arm and 41 in the placebo-first arm. At baseline, the mean number of hot flashes reported was 45.6 per week (SD = 29.6), ranging from 2 to 148. During the sertraline phase of the study, women experienced five fewer hot flashes per week than they did on the placebo (P = 0.002). The severity of hot flashes was not significantly different; however, the hot flash score (number x average severity) was significantly improved during the sertraline phase.

CONCLUSION

Sertraline reduced the number of hot flashes and improved the hot flash score relative to placebo and may be an acceptable alternative treatment for women experiencing hot flashes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. pgordon@u.arizona.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16837878

Citation

Gordon, Paul R., et al. "Sertraline to Treat Hot Flashes: a Randomized Controlled, Double-blind, Crossover Trial in a General Population." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 13, no. 4, 2006, pp. 568-75.
Gordon PR, Kerwin JP, Boesen KG, et al. Sertraline to treat hot flashes: a randomized controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in a general population. Menopause. 2006;13(4):568-75.
Gordon, P. R., Kerwin, J. P., Boesen, K. G., & Senf, J. (2006). Sertraline to treat hot flashes: a randomized controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in a general population. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 13(4), 568-75.
Gordon PR, et al. Sertraline to Treat Hot Flashes: a Randomized Controlled, Double-blind, Crossover Trial in a General Population. Menopause. 2006 Jul-Aug;13(4):568-75. PubMed PMID: 16837878.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sertraline to treat hot flashes: a randomized controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in a general population. AU - Gordon,Paul R, AU - Kerwin,James P, AU - Boesen,Kelly Green, AU - Senf,Janet, PY - 2006/7/14/pubmed PY - 2006/10/20/medline PY - 2006/7/14/entrez SP - 568 EP - 75 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (sertraline) in decreasing hot flashes in a general population of women. DESIGN: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted in a southwestern urban setting. A total of 102 women aged 40 to 65 who were experiencing hot flashes and not taking any hormone therapy were recruited. After 1 week of baseline hot flash data collection, study participants were randomized to receive placebo or active drug (sertraline 50 mg) for 4 weeks. This intervention was followed by a 1-week washout and cross over to the opposite treatment for 4 weeks. The number and severity of hot flashes were measured. RESULTS: One hundred two women were enrolled in the study. Five dropped out before providing baseline data. Of the 97 remaining, 52 were randomized to active drug first and 45 to placebo first. Ten dropped out of the study before completing all 10 weeks, leaving 46 in the active drug-first arm and 41 in the placebo-first arm. At baseline, the mean number of hot flashes reported was 45.6 per week (SD = 29.6), ranging from 2 to 148. During the sertraline phase of the study, women experienced five fewer hot flashes per week than they did on the placebo (P = 0.002). The severity of hot flashes was not significantly different; however, the hot flash score (number x average severity) was significantly improved during the sertraline phase. CONCLUSION: Sertraline reduced the number of hot flashes and improved the hot flash score relative to placebo and may be an acceptable alternative treatment for women experiencing hot flashes. SN - 1072-3714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16837878/Sertraline_to_treat_hot_flashes:_a_randomized_controlled_double_blind_crossover_trial_in_a_general_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.gme.0000196595.82452.ca DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -