Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain.
Man Ther. 2006 Nov; 11(4):316-20.MT

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if patients who do not receive manipulation for their low back pain (LBP) are at an increased risk for worsening disability compared to patients receiving an exercise intervention without manipulation. One hundred and thirty-one consecutive patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive manipulation and an exercise intervention (n = 70) or an exercise intervention without manipulation (n = 61). Patients were classified as to whether they had experienced a worsening in disability upon follow-up. Relative risk and number needed to treat (NNT) statistics and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Patients who completed the exercise intervention without manipulation were eight (95% CI: 1.1, 63.5) times more likely to experience a worsening in disability than patients who received manipulation. The NNT with manipulation to prevent one additional patient from experiencing a worsening in disability was 9.9 (95% CI: 4.9, 65.3) and 4 weeks with manipulation was 11.6 (95% CI: 5.2, 219.2). The results of this study offer an additional perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation and help to inform the integration of current evidence for spinal manipulation into healthcare policy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Army-Baylor University Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy, 3151 Scott Rd., Rm 2307, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16839800

Citation

Childs, John D., et al. "A Perspective for Considering the Risks and Benefits of Spinal Manipulation in Patients With Low Back Pain." Manual Therapy, vol. 11, no. 4, 2006, pp. 316-20.
Childs JD, Flynn TW, Fritz JM. A perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain. Man Ther. 2006;11(4):316-20.
Childs, J. D., Flynn, T. W., & Fritz, J. M. (2006). A perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain. Manual Therapy, 11(4), 316-20.
Childs JD, Flynn TW, Fritz JM. A Perspective for Considering the Risks and Benefits of Spinal Manipulation in Patients With Low Back Pain. Man Ther. 2006;11(4):316-20. PubMed PMID: 16839800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain. AU - Childs,John D, AU - Flynn,Timothy W, AU - Fritz,Julie M, Y1 - 2006/07/12/ PY - 2004/05/19/received PY - 2005/07/30/revised PY - 2005/09/21/accepted PY - 2006/7/15/pubmed PY - 2007/1/11/medline PY - 2006/7/15/entrez SP - 316 EP - 20 JF - Manual therapy JO - Man Ther VL - 11 IS - 4 N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine if patients who do not receive manipulation for their low back pain (LBP) are at an increased risk for worsening disability compared to patients receiving an exercise intervention without manipulation. One hundred and thirty-one consecutive patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive manipulation and an exercise intervention (n = 70) or an exercise intervention without manipulation (n = 61). Patients were classified as to whether they had experienced a worsening in disability upon follow-up. Relative risk and number needed to treat (NNT) statistics and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Patients who completed the exercise intervention without manipulation were eight (95% CI: 1.1, 63.5) times more likely to experience a worsening in disability than patients who received manipulation. The NNT with manipulation to prevent one additional patient from experiencing a worsening in disability was 9.9 (95% CI: 4.9, 65.3) and 4 weeks with manipulation was 11.6 (95% CI: 5.2, 219.2). The results of this study offer an additional perspective for considering the risks and benefits of spinal manipulation and help to inform the integration of current evidence for spinal manipulation into healthcare policy. SN - 1356-689X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16839800/A_perspective_for_considering_the_risks_and_benefits_of_spinal_manipulation_in_patients_with_low_back_pain_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1356-689X(05)00126-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -