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Multifocal pattern electroretinogram: cellular origins and clinical implications.
Optom Vis Sci. 2006 Jul; 83(7):473-85.OV

Abstract

PURPOSES

The purposes of this article are to gain insight into the cellular origins of the multifocal pattern electroretinogram (mPERG) and evaluate its potential for clinical use.

METHODS

mPERGs were recorded from four anesthetized monkeys before and after pharmacologic blockade of light-driven activity of inner-retinal neurons and from 55 normal human subjects (19-91 years) and six patients with glaucoma (43-77 years of age). Stimuli consisted of counterphase-modulated black and white triangles organized in 61-scaled hexagons with mean luminance 100 cd/m2 and 100% contrast. The stimulus array subtended 31 degrees vertically and 37 degrees horizontally at 48 cm. The amplifier cutoff frequencies were 3 and 100 Hz. Responses were grouped as quadrants and the first slice of the second-order kernel was analyzed.

RESULTS

The mPERG responses of monkeys and humans were similar. In the monkey responses, there was an early positive potential (P1) around 25 ms and a later positive potential (P2) found selectively in the nasal field quadrants around 31 ms. These responses were seen around 22 and 36 ms in the human responses. After blockade of inner-retinal activity in monkeys, P1 amplitude was greatly reduced at all retinal locations and P2 was eliminated. P1 and P2 amplitudes were significantly reduced in the glaucomatous eyes relative to amplitudes of age-matched controls. Reductions in the amplitudes of P1 and P2 could easily discriminate between glaucomatous visual field quadrants with and without behavioral sensitivity losses. However, these alterations are likely to reflect diffuse losses.

CONCLUSIONS

mPERG responses contain prominent contributions from inner-retinal neurons that can be reduced in glaucomatous eyes. These findings raise the possibility that the mPERG could be potentially useful in the objective estimation of neural damage in glaucoma. However, further refinement of recording techniques will be required if the mPERG is to be used to detect focal damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Indiana University School of Optometry, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16840872

Citation

Harrison, Wendy W., et al. "Multifocal Pattern Electroretinogram: Cellular Origins and Clinical Implications." Optometry and Vision Science : Official Publication of the American Academy of Optometry, vol. 83, no. 7, 2006, pp. 473-85.
Harrison WW, Viswanathan S, Malinovsky VE. Multifocal pattern electroretinogram: cellular origins and clinical implications. Optom Vis Sci. 2006;83(7):473-85.
Harrison, W. W., Viswanathan, S., & Malinovsky, V. E. (2006). Multifocal pattern electroretinogram: cellular origins and clinical implications. Optometry and Vision Science : Official Publication of the American Academy of Optometry, 83(7), 473-85.
Harrison WW, Viswanathan S, Malinovsky VE. Multifocal Pattern Electroretinogram: Cellular Origins and Clinical Implications. Optom Vis Sci. 2006;83(7):473-85. PubMed PMID: 16840872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multifocal pattern electroretinogram: cellular origins and clinical implications. AU - Harrison,Wendy W, AU - Viswanathan,Suresh, AU - Malinovsky,Victor E, PY - 2006/7/15/pubmed PY - 2006/8/23/medline PY - 2006/7/15/entrez SP - 473 EP - 85 JF - Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry JO - Optom Vis Sci VL - 83 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSES: The purposes of this article are to gain insight into the cellular origins of the multifocal pattern electroretinogram (mPERG) and evaluate its potential for clinical use. METHODS: mPERGs were recorded from four anesthetized monkeys before and after pharmacologic blockade of light-driven activity of inner-retinal neurons and from 55 normal human subjects (19-91 years) and six patients with glaucoma (43-77 years of age). Stimuli consisted of counterphase-modulated black and white triangles organized in 61-scaled hexagons with mean luminance 100 cd/m2 and 100% contrast. The stimulus array subtended 31 degrees vertically and 37 degrees horizontally at 48 cm. The amplifier cutoff frequencies were 3 and 100 Hz. Responses were grouped as quadrants and the first slice of the second-order kernel was analyzed. RESULTS: The mPERG responses of monkeys and humans were similar. In the monkey responses, there was an early positive potential (P1) around 25 ms and a later positive potential (P2) found selectively in the nasal field quadrants around 31 ms. These responses were seen around 22 and 36 ms in the human responses. After blockade of inner-retinal activity in monkeys, P1 amplitude was greatly reduced at all retinal locations and P2 was eliminated. P1 and P2 amplitudes were significantly reduced in the glaucomatous eyes relative to amplitudes of age-matched controls. Reductions in the amplitudes of P1 and P2 could easily discriminate between glaucomatous visual field quadrants with and without behavioral sensitivity losses. However, these alterations are likely to reflect diffuse losses. CONCLUSIONS: mPERG responses contain prominent contributions from inner-retinal neurons that can be reduced in glaucomatous eyes. These findings raise the possibility that the mPERG could be potentially useful in the objective estimation of neural damage in glaucoma. However, further refinement of recording techniques will be required if the mPERG is to be used to detect focal damage. SN - 1040-5488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16840872/Multifocal_pattern_electroretinogram:_cellular_origins_and_clinical_implications_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.opx.0000218319.61580.a5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -