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Prospective study of fruits and vegetables and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men.

Abstract

The authors prospectively evaluated fruit and vegetable consumption and the incidence of oral premalignant lesions among 42,311 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Diet was assessed every 4 years by food frequency questionnaires. The authors confirmed 207 cases of clinically or histopathologically diagnosed oral premalignant lesions occurring between 1986 and 2002. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks were calculated from proportional hazards models. Significant inverse associations were observed with citrus fruits, citrus fruit juice, and vitamin-C-rich fruits and vegetables, indicating 30-40% lower risks with greater intakes (e.g., citrus fruit juice quintile 5 vs. quintile 1 relative risk = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 0.99). Inverse associations with fruits did not vary by smoking status and were stronger in analyses of baseline consumption, with a 10-year lag time to disease follow-up (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1 relative risk = 0.41, 95% confidence interval: 0.20, 0.82; p = 0.01). No associations were observed with total vegetables or with beta-carotene-rich or lycopene-rich fruits and vegetables. For current smokers, green leafy vegetables (ptrend = 0.05) and beta-carotene-rich fruits and vegetables (ptrend = 0.02) showed significant linear trends of increased risk (one additional serving/day relative risk = 1.7). The risk of oral premalignant lesions was significantly reduced with higher consumption of fruits, particularly citrus fruits and juices, while no consistent associations were apparent for vegetables.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 164:6 2006 Sep 15 pg 556-66

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Diet
    Fruit
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Mouth Neoplasms
    Precancerous Conditions
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16847039

    Citation

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi, et al. "Prospective Study of Fruits and Vegetables and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 164, no. 6, 2006, pp. 556-66.
    Maserejian NN, Giovannucci E, Rosner B, et al. Prospective study of fruits and vegetables and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. Am J Epidemiol. 2006;164(6):556-66.
    Maserejian, N. N., Giovannucci, E., Rosner, B., Zavras, A., & Joshipura, K. (2006). Prospective study of fruits and vegetables and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. American Journal of Epidemiology, 164(6), pp. 556-66.
    Maserejian NN, et al. Prospective Study of Fruits and Vegetables and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):556-66. PubMed PMID: 16847039.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of fruits and vegetables and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. AU - Maserejian,Nancy Nairi, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Zavras,Athanasios, AU - Joshipura,Kaumudi, Y1 - 2006/07/17/ PY - 2006/7/19/pubmed PY - 2006/10/14/medline PY - 2006/7/19/entrez SP - 556 EP - 66 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 164 IS - 6 N2 - The authors prospectively evaluated fruit and vegetable consumption and the incidence of oral premalignant lesions among 42,311 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Diet was assessed every 4 years by food frequency questionnaires. The authors confirmed 207 cases of clinically or histopathologically diagnosed oral premalignant lesions occurring between 1986 and 2002. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks were calculated from proportional hazards models. Significant inverse associations were observed with citrus fruits, citrus fruit juice, and vitamin-C-rich fruits and vegetables, indicating 30-40% lower risks with greater intakes (e.g., citrus fruit juice quintile 5 vs. quintile 1 relative risk = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 0.99). Inverse associations with fruits did not vary by smoking status and were stronger in analyses of baseline consumption, with a 10-year lag time to disease follow-up (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1 relative risk = 0.41, 95% confidence interval: 0.20, 0.82; p = 0.01). No associations were observed with total vegetables or with beta-carotene-rich or lycopene-rich fruits and vegetables. For current smokers, green leafy vegetables (ptrend = 0.05) and beta-carotene-rich fruits and vegetables (ptrend = 0.02) showed significant linear trends of increased risk (one additional serving/day relative risk = 1.7). The risk of oral premalignant lesions was significantly reduced with higher consumption of fruits, particularly citrus fruits and juices, while no consistent associations were apparent for vegetables. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16847039/Prospective_study_of_fruits_and_vegetables_and_risk_of_oral_premalignant_lesions_in_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwj233 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -