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Antizyme inhibitor: mysterious modulator of cell proliferation.
Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006 Sep; 63(18):2095-101.CM

Abstract

In contrast to the considerable interest in the oncogene ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and in the family of antizymes with regard to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, the endogenous antizyme inhibitor (AZI) has been less well studied. AZI is highly homologous to the enzyme ODC but does not possess any decarboxylase activity. Elevated ODC activity is associated with most forms of human malignancies. Antizymes bind ODC, inhibit ODC activity and promote the ubiquitin-independent degradation of ODC. Consequently they are proposed as tumor suppressors. In particular, the most studied member of the antizyme family, antizyme 1, has been demonstrated to play a role in tumor suppression. AZI inactivates all members of the antizyme family, reactivates ODC and prevents the proteolytic degradation of ODC, which may suggest a role for AZI in tumor progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program in Vascular Biology, Children's Hospital, Karp Family Building, 1 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ursula.mangold@childrens.harvard.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16847581

Citation

Mangold, U. "Antizyme Inhibitor: Mysterious Modulator of Cell Proliferation." Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS, vol. 63, no. 18, 2006, pp. 2095-101.
Mangold U. Antizyme inhibitor: mysterious modulator of cell proliferation. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006;63(18):2095-101.
Mangold, U. (2006). Antizyme inhibitor: mysterious modulator of cell proliferation. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS, 63(18), 2095-101.
Mangold U. Antizyme Inhibitor: Mysterious Modulator of Cell Proliferation. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006;63(18):2095-101. PubMed PMID: 16847581.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antizyme inhibitor: mysterious modulator of cell proliferation. A1 - Mangold,U, PY - 2006/7/19/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/7/19/entrez SP - 2095 EP - 101 JF - Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS JO - Cell. Mol. Life Sci. VL - 63 IS - 18 N2 - In contrast to the considerable interest in the oncogene ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and in the family of antizymes with regard to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, the endogenous antizyme inhibitor (AZI) has been less well studied. AZI is highly homologous to the enzyme ODC but does not possess any decarboxylase activity. Elevated ODC activity is associated with most forms of human malignancies. Antizymes bind ODC, inhibit ODC activity and promote the ubiquitin-independent degradation of ODC. Consequently they are proposed as tumor suppressors. In particular, the most studied member of the antizyme family, antizyme 1, has been demonstrated to play a role in tumor suppression. AZI inactivates all members of the antizyme family, reactivates ODC and prevents the proteolytic degradation of ODC, which may suggest a role for AZI in tumor progression. SN - 1420-682X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16847581/Antizyme_inhibitor:_mysterious_modulator_of_cell_proliferation_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00018-005-5583-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -