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Memory deficits in children with and at risk for anxiety disorders.
Depress Anxiety. 2007; 24(2):85-94.DA

Abstract

There are limited data on the neurocognitive correlates of childhood anxiety disorders. The objective of this study was to examine whether visual and verbal memory deficits of nonemotional stimuli are (1) a shared feature of three common childhood anxiety disorders (social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder) or whether these deficits are restricted to specific anxiety disorders, and (2) present in offspring who possess at least one of the following established risk factors for anxiety disorders, parental history of panic disorder (PD), or major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty offspring, ages 9-20 years, were recruited from parents with lifetime diagnoses of PD, MDD, PD plus MDD, or neither illness. Different clinicians blindly administered semistructured diagnostic interviews to offspring and parents. Verbal and visual memory subtests of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning were administered to offspring. The results showed that offspring with ongoing social phobia demonstrated reduced visual but not verbal memory scores compared to those without social phobia when controlling for offspring IQ, separation anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. No other offspring anxiety disorder predicted memory performance. Neither parental PD nor parental MDD was associated with offspring memory performance. These findings are relevant to understanding the phenomenology of childhood anxiety disorders and may provide insights into the neural circuits underlying these disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21211, USA. vasa@kennedykrieger.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16850413

Citation

Vasa, Roma A., et al. "Memory Deficits in Children With and at Risk for Anxiety Disorders." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 24, no. 2, 2007, pp. 85-94.
Vasa RA, Roberson-Nay R, Klein RG, et al. Memory deficits in children with and at risk for anxiety disorders. Depress Anxiety. 2007;24(2):85-94.
Vasa, R. A., Roberson-Nay, R., Klein, R. G., Mannuzza, S., Moulton, J. L., Guardino, M., Merikangas, A., Carlino, A. R., & Pine, D. S. (2007). Memory deficits in children with and at risk for anxiety disorders. Depression and Anxiety, 24(2), 85-94.
Vasa RA, et al. Memory Deficits in Children With and at Risk for Anxiety Disorders. Depress Anxiety. 2007;24(2):85-94. PubMed PMID: 16850413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Memory deficits in children with and at risk for anxiety disorders. AU - Vasa,Roma A, AU - Roberson-Nay,Roxann, AU - Klein,Rachel G, AU - Mannuzza,Salvatore, AU - Moulton,John L,3rd AU - Guardino,Mary, AU - Merikangas,Alison, AU - Carlino,Anthony R, AU - Pine,Daniel S, PY - 2006/7/20/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2006/7/20/entrez SP - 85 EP - 94 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 24 IS - 2 N2 - There are limited data on the neurocognitive correlates of childhood anxiety disorders. The objective of this study was to examine whether visual and verbal memory deficits of nonemotional stimuli are (1) a shared feature of three common childhood anxiety disorders (social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder) or whether these deficits are restricted to specific anxiety disorders, and (2) present in offspring who possess at least one of the following established risk factors for anxiety disorders, parental history of panic disorder (PD), or major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty offspring, ages 9-20 years, were recruited from parents with lifetime diagnoses of PD, MDD, PD plus MDD, or neither illness. Different clinicians blindly administered semistructured diagnostic interviews to offspring and parents. Verbal and visual memory subtests of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning were administered to offspring. The results showed that offspring with ongoing social phobia demonstrated reduced visual but not verbal memory scores compared to those without social phobia when controlling for offspring IQ, separation anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. No other offspring anxiety disorder predicted memory performance. Neither parental PD nor parental MDD was associated with offspring memory performance. These findings are relevant to understanding the phenomenology of childhood anxiety disorders and may provide insights into the neural circuits underlying these disorders. SN - 1091-4269 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16850413/Memory_deficits_in_children_with_and_at_risk_for_anxiety_disorders_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -